The University Record, January 8, 2001

MLK Day 2001: Commitment and Renewal

Editor’s Note: Please check the Web at www.mlksymposium.org for the most up-to-date information on times and locations. This information was current as of Dec. 25, 2000.

Monday, January 8

Covering Race Then and Now: The Press and Public Policy—Panel discussion with David Halberstam, Paul Delaney, Gene Roberts and John Seigenthaler, 1 p.m., Rackham Amphitheater

Sponsor: Dialogues on Diversity and the Michigan Journalism Fellows Program

Prominent journalists will give their views on how the press has affected public policy, both in the 1960s and now. Speakers include David Halberstam, author of Walking with the Wind; Paul Delaney, director of the Center for the Study of Race and Media at Howard University; Gene Roberts, former managing editor of the New York Times and currently a faculty member at the University of Maryland; and John Seigenthaler, former editor at USA Today and founder of the First Amendment Center at Vanderbilt University. This program is partially funded by the W.K. Kellogg Foundation.

Wednesday, January 10

Special ScreeningDo the Right Thing, 8 p.m., Michigan League Underground

Sponsor: Michigan League Programming Office

This original film by Spike Lee combines humor, drama and music to explore issues of race during a summer heat wave in Brooklyn. Discussion to follow showing of the film.

Thursday, January 11

MLK Opening Lecture Reception for Manning Marable, 3:30 p.m., Library, Center for Afroamerican and African Studies (CAAS), West Hall

Sponsor: Center for Afroamerican and African Studies and the 2001 MLK Symposium Planning Committee

Join CAAS faculty, staff and students as they welcome Manning Marable to the University. Refreshments provided.

Race Society and the Digital Divide Lecture—Manning Marable, 7 p.m., Michigan League Ballroom

Sponsor: 2001 MLK Symposium Planning Committee and the Center for Afroamerican and African Studies

Manning Marable is professor of history and political science and the founding director of the Institute for Research in African American Studies at Columbia University. Marable is the author of 13 books and recently initiated a new quarterly journal, Souls: A Critical Journal of Black Politics, Culture and Society, which examines theoretical issues within Black America, Africa and the Caribbean. He regularly appears on NBC’s “Today Show,” ABC’s “Weekend News,” PBS, Fox Network News,

C-Span, National Public Radio, the “Charlie Rose” show and BBC television and radio. His lecture will focus on the contemporary implications of race, technology and social stratification in the 21st century.

Friday, January 12

Middle Passages: The Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade and North American Slavery Lecture—Thomas C. Holt, 10 a.m., Room 1023, Tisch Hall

Sponsor: Comparative Study of Social Transformations (CSST), Atlantic Studies Initiative, LS&A, Department of History and the Center for Afroamerican and African Studies

Holt will present a seminar lecture that explores the Middle Passage and Atlantic Slave Trade, and lead a question-and-answer session following the lecture.

The Problem of Race in the 21st Century—Thomas C. Holt, 4 p.m., Assembly Hall, Rackham Building

Sponsor: Comparative Study of Social Transformations (CSST), Atlantic Studies Initiative, LS&A, Department of History and the Center for Afroamerican and African Studies

The Program in the Comparative Study of Social Transformations Diasporas Colloquium Series welcomes Thomas C. Holt, the James Westfall Thompson Professor of American and African American History at the University of Chicago. His most recent publication, with co-authors Frederick Cooper and Rebecca J. Scott, is titled Beyond Slavery: Explorations of Race, Labor and Citizenship in Post-Emancipation Societies (University of North Carolina Press, 2000).

Hip-Hop Explosion: The Fantastic Voyage Featuring Slum Village , 7:30 p.m., Michigan League Ballroom

Sponsor: MLK Symposium Planning Committee, the Black Student Union, Komposit, Black Vibes and the Office of Major Events

Critically acclaimed hip-hop recording group Slum Village will headline a concert that features other hip-hop artists from the Ann Arbor and Detroit Area —SUN with Prime Numbers and the Athletic Mic League. Slum Village’s recent release, “Fantastic Voyage 2,” features performances by Q-tip, D’Angelo and many more. Atmospheric hip-hop vibes provided by B. Cook. Tickets, $10, are available at the Michigan Union Ticket Office and all TicketMaster locations. There will be no on-site ticket sales.

The Fantastic Voyage After-Party and Open Mic Session—Hosted by Komposit, 9 p.m., Michigan League Underground

Sponsor: Komposit

Ann Arbor’s hottest DJ crew, Komposit, hosts the Fantastic Voyage after-party. Underground hip-hop, dancing and open mic session for all up-and-coming emcees. DJ Snake Eyes from Komposit on the ones and twos. $7 admission; no pre-sale tickets.

Saturday, January 13

Re-imagining South Africa and the Political Imagination of South Africans, 9 a.m., Room 1636, International Center, Social Work Building

Sponsor: Center for Afroamerican and African Studies’ South African Initiatives Office, the Africa Workshop, the International Institute, the Horace H. Rackham School of Graduate Studies, the Office of Academic Multicultural Initiatives, the Department of History, the Department of Anthropology and the Department of Comparative Literature’s Global Ethnic Literatures Project

Scholars and political activists from South Africa and the United States will present a range of papers that address important themes in South African history and political life. Oriented toward discussion, this one-day conference will feature current work from national and international scholars.

Whirlwinds of Revolt, 8 p.m., Michigan League Underground

Sponsor: United for Equality and Affirmative Action, Coalition to Defend Affirmative Action by Any Means Necessary

Open mic event of spoken-word performances, music, poetry and rap.

The Devastating Divas of Delta Sigma Theta—Founders Day Party and Infamous Step Show, 9 p.m., Michigan Union Ballroom

Sponsor: Delta Sigma Theta Sorority Inc.

The women of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, NU Chapter, present its annual Founders Day Party and Step Show. The step shows feature a combination of music, dancing, singing, chanting and precise rhythmic movements. Admission is $4 with a canned good before 10:13 p.m. Inflation may occur later in the evening, so come early.

Sunday, January 14

Black Volunteer Network 2nd Annual MLK High School Visitation Weekend, noon, Trotter House

Sponsor: Black Volunteer Network and the 2001 MLK Symposium Planning Committee

The Black Volunteer Network (BVN) and other

U-M student leaders will host 50 high school students during the 2001 MLK Day Symposium. Visitors will attend MLK Symposium events and engage in organized workshops and one-on-one discussions with members of the BVN and others working with the program. To volunteer, contact Demitra Taylor, (734) 764-0160 or detaylor@umich.edu.g

An Overview of the Case: Puting Racism, Sexism and Social Inequality on Trial, noon, Vandenburg Room, Michigan League

Sponsor: Student Intervenors Legal Team

The Student Intervenors Legal Team defends affirmative action.

Standardized Testing and Affirmative Action—David White, 1 p.m., Lecture Room 1, Modern Languages Building

Sponsor: Law Students for Affirmative Action

David White is founder and director of Testing for the Public, a nonprofit group focused on understanding standardized testing and its implications for underrepresented groups. He will discuss the lack of predictive value of standardized tests and the cultural, racial, gender and class biases embedded in test questions. White also will discuss how race, gender and class shape perceptions and influence answer selection on standardized tests and the role of the Educational Testing Service in reinforcing test disparity through item selection.

Affirmative Action and Segregation Lecture—Walter Allen, 3:30 p.m., Lecture Room 1, Modern Languages Building

Sponsor: Defend Affirmative Action Party

Walter Allen, a University of California, Los Angeles, professor, is a national scholar in the areas of diversity and higher education and has testified as an expert witness in many legal cases relating to desegregation and affirmative action. His talk is particularly relevant to students interested in the interaction and influence of sociology on the law and educational policy. Allen’s discussion of the methodology used in his research is of particular interest to graduate students involved in research design.

Campus Racism and Cross Group Interaction—Danny Solorzano, 4:30 p.m., Lecture Room 1, Modern Languages Building

Sponsor: The Palestine Committee and the Muslim Student Association

Danny Solorzano’s research shows that lower numbers of Black, Latino and other minority students in majority white schools increases the problems of campus racism and sexism and can lead to higher levels of student demoralization, failure and departure. Solorzano will address these and other topics.

Lift Every Voice and Sing—Detroit Mosaic Singers, 4:30 p.m., Trueblood Theatre, Frieze Building

Sponsor: Department of Theatre and Drama and the 2001 MLK Symposium Planning Committee

The Detroit Mosaic Singers are the musical wing of the internationally acclaimed Mosaic Youth Theater Group. These incredible young singers have performed to standing ovations around the country and will present a number of selections in honor of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. holiday. Tickets are available through the University Productions box office, (734) 764-5387.

The MLK Memorial Keynote Speaker Reception with Edward James Olmos, 5 p.m., East Hall Atrium

Sponsor: MLK Symposium Planning Committee, Latino Studies, Program in American Culture, the Latino Task Force and Multi-Ethnic Student Affairs

Join the University and Ann Arbor communities as we welcome Edward James Olmos to the University. Light refreshments provided. This reception is open to the public.

Mobilization and the Latino Community in the 21st Century—A Town Hall Meeting, 7 p.m., Room 4448, East Hall

Sponsor: Latino Studies, Program in American Culture and the Latino Task Force

Latino Studies and the Latino Task Force will host a town hall meeting following the reception for the keynote speaker, Edward James Olmos. The main topic of discussion is student activism in the Latino Community and its potential for change on college campuses.

United for Equality and Affirmative Action, Marcus Feldman, 7 p.m., Lecture Room 1, Modern Languages Building

Sponsor: Sister 2 Sister, Advocates for Student Parents and the Office of Academic Multicultural Initiatives

Marcus Feldman is an expert on the confluence between genetics and the environment on individual development. His research refutes studies that equate intelligence with race and highlights the importance of socio-environmental factors in limiting opportunities for success in low-income minority communities.

Monday, January 15

Representing Race, Class and Gender, 8 a.m., Pond Room, Michigan Union

Sponsor: Sweetland Writing Center

A panel discussion of media resources that enliven classrooms and encourage activism. For instructors, student facilitators and community members. Continental breakfast is provided.

Race Relations and Sport: A Viewing of the Curt Flood Gallery, 9 a.m., Room 1030/1040, Central Campus Recreation Building

Sponsor: Division of Kinesiology and the Paul Robeson Research Center

The Paul Robeson Research Center is dedicated to exploring images of race and racism in sports. The Center’s Curt Flood Gallery currently houses an exhibition of racial images ranging from Paul Robeson to Michael Jordan. The exhibition is open 9 a.m.–7 p.m. Jan. 15–19. For a special tour, contact the Paul Robeson Research Center.

MLK Day Children’s Program, 9 a.m., Mendelssohn Theatre, Michigan League

Sponsor: School of Education, the School of Social Work and the 2001 MLK Symposium Planning Committee

A day of cultural and educational activities for children of all ages. The program features performances by the Mosaic Youth Choir, the Indian American Student Association, Robert Jones (Blues for Schools) and impersonator Kemba, who portrays historical African American women in a dramatic one-woman show. Following a pizza lunch, a series of educational workshops will be led by School of Education students and volunteers. The animated documentary film Our Friend Martin will be shown.

Olmos
The Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Lecture—Edward James Olmos, 10 a.m., Hill Auditorium

Sponsor: 2001 MLK Symposium Planning Committee

Edward James Olmos is an actor, producer, director and community activist who was born and raised in East Los Angeles. In April 1999, Olmos launched a nationwide multimedia project called “Americanos: Latino Life in the United States,” a celebration of Latino culture through photography, film, music and the printed word. He also is executive director of the Lives in Hazard Educational Project, a national gang prevention program funded by the U.S. Department of Justice. He will deliver the 14th Annual Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Lecture on the Symposium theme of “Commitment and Renewal.”

U-M Business and Finance Convocation, 11:30 a.m., Power Center

Sponsor: Business and Finance Division

This event features both refreshments and entertainment, beginning at 11:30 a.m. The first performance is scheduled for 12:15 p.m. and features Empatheatre. The theatrical group will perform two or three improvisational skits focused on this year’s theme of “Commitment and Renewal.” Also scheduled to appear are the Business and Finance Diversity Choir, the John E. Lawrence Band and the Highest Praise Gospel Ensemble.

Educational Reform Roundtable Discussion—Ronald Ferguson, noon, Koessler Room, Michigan League

Sponsor: School of Education, the School of Social Work and the 2001 MLK Symposium Planning Committee

Ronald Ferguson will engage with local educators, administrators and others regarding issues of educational reform and the achievement gap in an interactive dialogue that is open to the public.

Commitment and Renewal: Improving Health Care for All, noon, Dow Auditorium, Towsley Center

Sponsor: College of Pharmacy, U-M Health System, School of Dentistry, School of Public Health, School of Nursing, Medical School and the School of Social Work

Keynote speaker Reuben Warren, associate administrator for urban affairs at the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry in Atlanta, will discuss health care concerns from a dental health/research/public health perspective.

Martin Luther King Day March and Rally, noon, South University and Forest avenues

Sponsor: Coalition to Defend Affirmative Action and Integration

Join members of the Coalition to Defend Affirmative Action and Integration and others supporting affirmative action to march to the Diag for a rally in support of affirmative action and integration.

Acting on the Dream: The MLK Day of Service, 12:30 p.m., Room 1800, Atrium, Chemistry Building

Sponsor: Project SERVE-Campus Programs/Spark and the 2001 MLK Symposium Planning Committee

In 1994, the Martin Luther King Jr. Federal Holiday Commission issued a challenge to communities nationwide—honor the memory of King by celebrating MLK Day with a day of service. In response to this challenge, the MLK Symposium Planning Committee, in cooperation with Project SERVE, sponsored the first Acting on the Dream day during the 1995 MLK Symposium. In its first year, some 100 members of the Ann Arbor campus community participated in the event. Last year, participation was nearly triple this number. All U-M faculty, staff and students are eligible to participate. There will be a brief introductory session before participants are led to various community-based agencies in the Ann Arbor and Ypsilanti area. Transportation will be provided to and from community sites. Participants receive a free MLK commemorative T-shirt and are invited to a reception and slide show held the following week.

Collecting and Interpreting Race and Ethnicity Data: Census 2000 and Beyond, 1 p.m., Room 6050, Institute for Social Research

Sponsor: Department of Sociology and Institute for Social Science Research

Census 2000 marked a significant change in how the federal government collected race and ethnicity data—multiple racial categories are now available for selection. The Institute for Social Research and Department of Sociology will present a panel discussion on the factors leading to this change, the implications of this change for research and policy and alternative approaches to measuring race.

What Is Really Going On? Diversity at the University of Michigan—Earl Lewis, 1 p.m., East Room, Pierpont Commons

Sponsor: College of Engineering, National Organization of Black Chemists and Chemical Engineers and the Aerospace Minority Engineering Society

Earl Lewis is dean of the Horace H. Rackham School of Graduate Studies and a leading scholar of African American history. He will address the history of diversity at the University of Michigan and the realities of diversifying the student body. A question-and-answer session will follow.

Film Screening and Discussion of Eyes on the Prize and At the River I Stand, 1 p.m., Michigan Room, Michigan League

Sponsor: Office of Equity and Diversity Services

Two documentaries that chronicle civil rights marches in Chicago and Cicero, Ill., the 1967 Detroit riots and the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King’s participation in the city of Memphis sanitation workers’ strike are used to begin discussion of civil rights advocacy and mobilization at local and national levels.

Not without a Struggle: Paying Homage to the King, Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., 1 p.m., Amphitheater, Rackham Building

Sponsor: Women of Color Task Force

Debby Mitchell and the Inkster Community Choraliers will give dramatic and musical performances in honor of King and the civil rights movement.

U-M Business School MLK Keynote Lecture—Juan Williams, 1:30 p.m., Hale Auditorium, Business School

Sponsor: School of Business Administration

Juan Williams is creator of the award-winning series Eyes on the Prize and host of a syndicated talk show on National Public Radio. He also is a regular guest commentator on CNN’s “Crossfire.” Williams will provide a reflection in honor of Dr. King. A question-and-answer session and a reception follow the lecture.

Tafolla
Carmen Tafolla: “With Our Very Own Names,” 2 p.m., Michigan Union Ballroom

Sponsor: University Library, Office of Chief Information Officer and the School of Information

A noted author and speaker, Carmen Tafolla presents her one-woman theatrical performance as a moving mosaic of barrio voices that include the first-grader, the elderly person, the GI, the dropout and the professional. She delivers messages of acceptance, exploration and celebration of diversity. This dramatic portrait of the struggles, perspectives and experiences of the culturally diverse in our schools, universities and society has been performed around the world.

Speaker—U.S. Rep. John Conyers, 2 p.m., Rm 100, Hutchins Hall

Sponsor: Coalition to Defend Affirmative Action and Integration and Fight for Equality By Any Means Necessary

Conyers was re-elected in 1998 to his 18th term, winning 87 percent of the vote in Michigan’s 14th Congressional District.

A Focus on Outcomes, 2 p.m., Pendleton Room, Michigan Union

Sponsor: Office of Undergraduate Admissions and Office of Academic Multicultural Initiatives

A campus visitation program intended to engage prospective and current students in a conversation about life after one has obtained his/her U-M diploma. Three alumni of color are invited back to speak about their experiences at U-M and beyond. The goal of this program is to show both prospective and current students the full circle of the U-M experience.

Renewing the Commitment, 3 p.m., Kellogg Atrium, School of Dentistry

Sponsor: School of Dentistry, Office of the Dean and the Multicultural Affairs Committee

The School of Dentistry will host Rueben C. Warren, associate administrator for urban affairs at the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry in Atlanta. He will present a special oral health challenge lecture. The program also features music and an address from Dean William Kotowicz.

School Reform: Closing the Achievement Gap, 3 p.m., Room 1202, Schorling Auditorium, School of Education

Sponsor: School of Education, School of Social Work and 2001 MLK Symposium Planning Committee

Educators will discuss the persistence of the achievement gap and the need for education reform. Stephen Raudenbush of the U-M will moderate a panel that includes Ronald Ferguson of Harvard University; Rossi Ray-Taylor, superintendent, Ann Arbor Public Schools; and Robert Durrah, a school principal from Chicago. A question-and-answer period will follow the discussion.

“I May Not Get There With You: The True Martin Luther King Jr.”—Michael Eric Dyson, 3:30 p.m., Auditorium, Rackham Building

Sponsor: Horace H. Rackham School of Graduate Studies, School of Social Work and the Department of Communication Studies

Michael Eric Dyson, scholar, professor, public intellectual and author of the controversial and just-released book I May Not Get There With You: The True Martin Luther King Jr. will speak at this event. The program will begin with a short film created for children about Martin Luther King Jr.

Civil Rights Issues: Obstacles and Strategies for Moving Forward, 4 p.m., Room 250, Hutchins Hall

Sponsor: Law School, Black Law Students Association, Asian Pacific Law Students Association and the Latino Law Students Association

The Law School is hosting a panel presentation on “Civil Rights: Issues, Obstacles and Strategies for Moving Forward.” Featured panelists are Michael Rodriguez (Mexican-American Legal Defense Fund) and U.S. federal judges Denise Page Hood and Algenon Marbley. A question-and-answer session and reception will follow the presentations.

Dr. Marjorie Lee Browne Colloquium—Strengthening the K-12 Curriculum in Science and Mathematics: An Absolute Must, 4:10 p.m., Room 1360, East Hall

Sponsor: Department of Mathematics

Evelyn Boyd Granville, the first African American Woman to earn a Ph.D. in mathematics, will deliver a lecture on “Strengthening the K-12 Curriculum in Science and Mathematics: An Absolute Must.” She will address the need to improve the quality of math and science education for adolescents to prepare them to pursue careers in science, engineering and technology. For additional information, visit www.math.lsa.umich.edu/mlk.

Gallery of Dreams, 5 p.m., Pierpont Commons Lobby

Sponsor: College of Engineering and National Society of Black Engineers

Gallery of Dreams will feature the work of artists from local high schools centered on cultural themes. In the spirit of Martin Luther King Jr., this event is intended to encourage young local artists to live their dreams by expressing themselves artistically while also inspiriting those attending the exhibition. First, second and third prizes are awarded to top artists. The exhibit will run through Jan. 18 and will feature an award presentation at 5 p.m. Jan. 15.

Blues and Politics: The Mingus Big Band—Vocalist Kevin Mahogany, 8 p. m., Hill Auditorium

Sponsor: University Musical Society, Detroit Edison Foundation, Wallace-Readers Digest Funds, JazzNet and Office of Academic Multicultural Initiatives

“Arguably the smokingest regularly performing big band on the planet.” (JazzTimes) At the beginning of the 21st century, the voice of the late, great bass player, Charles Mingus, is still speaking out, his music just as urgent as his earliest shouts and sermons from the stage. The group is joined by Kevin Mahogany, a jazz singer who belts the blues, croons sentimental ballads and pours his soul into gospel. Celebrate the Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s birthday with this great band.

Tuesday, January 16

Book Discussion: A Hope in the Unseen, noon, Room 1334, 400 North Ingalls Building

Sponsor: School of Nursing

The Office of Multicultural Affairs in the School of Nursing will host a discussion of the book A Hope in the Unseen: An American Odyssey From the Inner City to the Ivy League by Ron Suskind. A book reviewer for the Washington Monthly wrote: “A classic . . . simply the best thing I’ve ever read about the confusing thicket of questions surrounding the preferential treatment of disadvantaged Blacks. Before you utter another word about affirmative action—favorable or not—please subject yourself to the pleasurable and edifying experience of reading this superb book.”

Detroit Design Charrette: Grand River Avenue, 5 p.m., Cass Technical High School, Detroit

Sponsor: Office of the President and the Arts of Citizenship Program

The A. Alfred Taubman College of Architecture and Urban Planning hosts its annual Urban Design Charrette Jan. 12–16. The program culminates in a presentation of the results at 5 p.m. Jan. 16 at Cass Technical High School. The public is invited to this presentation, which will provide the opportunity to view drawings and hear proposals from each of the four design teams. This event endeavors to contribute ideas for the creative redevelopment and revitalization efforts of the Detroit metropolitan area.

Sandwiched Between Two Cultures, 7 p.m., Henderson Room, Michigan League

Sponsor: Michigan League Programming Office, Multi-Ethnic Student Affairs, Program on Intergroup Relations and United Asian Americans Organization.

This interactive dialogue provides second-generation minorities an opportunity to compare cross-cultural issues of identity. Participants will explore the dualities of growing up in the United States and how past and present experiences have shaped their identities.

Informational Meeting: Giving Back to the Community. (Tutoring and Mentorship), 7 p.m., Living Room, Couzens Hall

Sponsor: Michigan Community Scholars Program

Informational meeting for students interested in tutoring and mentoring middle and high school students in the tradition of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and the spirit of community service.

Movie Screening of GI Jane, 7 p.m., Auditorium, Chrysler Center

Sponsor: Tau Beta Pi, Society for Hispanic Professional Engineers and College of Engineering

In GI Jane, the first female Navy SEAL (Demi Moore) struggles to overcome a physically grueling schedule, harassment and sabotage, knowing that the future for women in the military depends on her success. Unaware that political forces are battling on opposite sides of the issue, she joins the SEALs in an experiment testing women’s effectiveness in male combat units. A discussion and refreshments will follow.

Wednesday, January 17

Commitment and Renewal through Care and Discovery, noon, Room 1334, 400 North Ingalls Building

Sponsor: School of Nursing

Nurses reflect on commitment and renewal through nursing practice, education and research.

Americans of Color—International! 6 p.m., Room 9, International Center, Social Work Building

Sponsor: International Center and Multi-Ethnic Student Affairs

An African American in Spain or Africa? Asian American in Italy? Latino/a in Europe or Latin America? Find out how you can get international experience through studying or working abroad, learn of the challenges and benefits and hear about possibilities for international careers.

Urban Sprawl, Justice, and the Environment: An Evening with Robert D. Bullard, 7 p.m., Hale Auditorium, School of Business Administration

Sponsor: Urban Planning Student Association, School of Natural Resources and Environment and the Department of Urban and Regional Planning

Robert Bullard is the director of the Environmental Justice Resource Center and the Ware Professor of Sociology at Clark Atlanta University. He will lecture on his most recent book, Sprawl City: Race, Politics, and Planning in Atlanta (Island Press, May 2000). He has played a major role in organizing and mobilizing the environmental justice movement over the past two decades, is one of the planners of the First National People of Color Environmental Leadership Summit and currently serves on the U.S. EPA National Environmental Justice Advisory Council.

Thursday, January 18

The Value of Diversity in the Workplace, noon, Sheldon Auditorium, Towsley Center

Sponsor: Department of Internal Medicine

The Department of Internal Medicine has asked its divisions to think about the value of diversity in the workplace through contributions to a short-essay contest. The contest is designed to help begin discussions in the 12 divisions and across the department to make the workplace an environment where all can feel welcomed and valued. Diversity is defined as inclusive of race, gender, ethnicity, sexual orientation, religion and class. Essays will be judged by a diverse committee representing faculty, administrators and clinic staff. Awards will be given to the top three essays submitted. A reading of the essays and a discussion will be led by the three winners.

North Campus Cultural Fair, 5:30 p.m., Chrysler Center Lobby and Media Union Gallery

Sponsor: College of Engineering, American Society for Engineering Education and the Society of Minority Engineering Students-Graduate

This fair provides a forum for students to share their diverse cultures and customs with the North Campus community. It features exhibits, performances and food from a wide array of cultural groups and will precede an MLK Talent Showcase.

Changing the Perspective of Health Care—Guadalupe Lara, 7 p.m., Anderson Room, Michigan Union

Sponsor: Lambda Theta Alpha Latin Sorority Inc.

Guadalupe Lara is a nationally recognized expert in minority health care issues and is a tremendous motivational speaker. Her lecture will focus on the importance of cultural sensitivity in health care.

North Campus MLK Spirit Awards Program, 7 p.m., Chesbrough Auditorium, Chrysler Center

Sponsor: College of Engineering, the A. Alfred Taubman College of Architecture and Urban Planning, the School of Art and Design, and the School of Music

Presentation of MLK Spirit Awards to honor undergraduate and graduate students from the sponsoring units who best exemplify the leadership and extraordinary vision of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. The program also includes “A Community of Voices”—an interdisciplinary and multimedia presentation by students from the Black Arts Council, School of Education, College of Engineering and School of Music. Nursing Prof. Elizabeth Allen will be the keynote speaker. Entertainment provided by the School of Music. A reception will follow in the lobby.

Hyenas: Serote Reflects on Art and the Struggle for Liberation, 7:30 p.m., Apse, Museum of Art

Sponsor: Museum of Art; Visiting Writers Program; Department of English; the King, Chavez, Parks’ Scholars Program of the Office of the Provost; and the Arts of Citizenship Program

Mongane Wally Serote is a novelist, poet and member of the South African Parliament. He is currently the chair of South Africa’s portfolio committee for the arts. Previously, he was a liberation fighter for 18 years while in exile from his country. He will lecture from his book of essays, The Hyenas.

Saturday, January 20

Motor City Blight Busters with the Michigan Community Scholars Program, 8 a.m., Lobby, Couzens Residence Hall

Sponsor: Michigan Community Scholars Program

The Michigan Community Scholars Program plans to kick off the year with some great community service with the Detroit Motor City Blight Busters. Join us as we work with this group to improve the city of Detroit.

Monday, January 22

Academic Life: In Search of the Perfect Metaphor—Michael Olivas, 12:30 p.m., Rm 250, Hutchins Hall

Sponsor: 2001 MLK Symposium Planning Committee and the Law School

Michael Olivas is the Bates Professor of Law at the University of Houston Law Center and the author of eight books, including a casebook on higher education law and a forthcoming Johns Hopkins University Press study, Dollars, Scholars, AND Public Policy; Financing College Debt in the 21st Century. His lecture will review recent higher education legal cases, including important admissions cases involving race, the legal aspects of grading and other issues. Olivas served two terms as the general counsel of the American Association of University Professors and has been an expert witness in more than a dozen legal cases, including the recent U.S. Supreme Court case, College Savings Bank v. State of Florida.

“Spinning into Butter”—A Reading and Discussion, 7:30 p.m., East Quad Auditorium

Sponsor: Residential College

Resiential College faculty and students will present a staged reading of Rebecca Gilman’s Spinning into Butter—a drama about racism on a small college campus. Following the performance, the audience will be invited to join cast members in a discussion of the issues raised in the performance.

Tuesday, January 23

Africa in the 21st Century: What Can We Do? 7 p.m., Kuenzel Room, Michigan Union

Sponsor: Students for the Advocacy of Africa

Students for the Advocacy of Africa will hold a panel discussion concerning issues that are and will be pertinent to Africa in the 21st century. The panel will include U-M faculty members Teshome Wagaw and Denis Ugwuegbu. Questions and answers will follow, and refreshments will be provided.

Wednesday, January 24

Native American Rights and Politics—John Ecohawk, 7 p.m., Pendleton Room, Michigan Union

Sponsor: Native American Student Association, Native American Law Student Association and the 2001 MLK Symposium Planning Committee

John Ecohawk is the founder and executive director of the Native American Rights Fund. He has been named one of the most influential lawyers in America by the National Law Journal. He will speak on contemporary legal issues facing Native Americans.

Movie Screening of Get on the Bus, 8 p.m., Michigan League Underground

Sponsor: Michigan League Programming Office

The film tells the story of 18 men who board a bus headed for the historic Million Man March as strangers but emerge three days and 2,000 miles later as brothers.

Thursday, January 25

Serving a Diverse Student Population, 11:30 a.m., Parker Room (2nd floor), Michigan Union

Sponsor: Student Activities and Leadership

This workshop will feature Susan Wilson, director of the Student Activities and Leadership Office. The workshop is focused on improving the effectiveness of student organizations and helping them develop boundary-crossing relationships with other groups. Participants will explore strategies for diversifying and developing collaborative relationships across campus.

Leadership Across Cultures and Context, 12:45 p.m., Parker Room (2nd floor), Michigan Union

Sponsor: Student Activities and Leadership

Dan Adams, assistant director of leadership education, is featured in this interactive workshop. The workshop introduces concepts of cross-cultural relations and their implications for leadership in an increasingly intercultural world. Participants will discuss how cultural identity influences the way we communicate with others.

Social Change from the Inside and Out, 2 p.m., Parker Room (2nd floor), Michigan Union

Sponsor: Student Activities and Leadership

This dialogue will challenge students to observe what social change means to them, what personal responsibilities arise and how ideas around social change connect them to others. Melita Pope Mitchell, interim assistant director of campus activities, will be the keynote speaker.

Friday, January 26

Adio Kerida: A Cuban Sephardic Journey—Film showing and talk by anthropology Prof. Ruth Behar, with comments by graduate student Umi Vaughan, 8 p.m., Room 2609, International Institute, School of Social Work Building

Sponsor: Latin American and Caribbean Studies Program

“Adio Kerida/Goodbye Dear Love: A Cuban Sephardic Journey” is a personal video documentary directed and produced by anthropology Prof. Ruth Behar about the search for identity and memory among Sephardic Jews with roots in Cuba. Issues of diversity and multiculturalism are presented through an examination of Jewish identity as it merges with Cuban and Latino/a identity. Stereotypes and mainstream images of both Jews and Latinos/as are challenged by showing that Jews can be Latinos/as and Latinos/as can be Jews. Adio Kerida is a story of continuing diasporas and intercultural adaptations.

Tuesday, January 30

In Search of Common Ground: Finding Our Way in a Diverse Democracy, 10 a.m., Rackham Amphitheater

Sponsor: Dialogues on Diversity, Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy, Law School, School of Social Work and School of Business Administration

“In Search of Common Ground” is a daylong conference featuring some of the nation’s leading practitioners and innovators of intergroup dialogue as they explore successful dialogue programs in education, civic and community organizations. Speakers include directors from the Anti-Defamation League, Hope in the Cities and the National Conference for Community and Justice. Join us for sessions on “Intergroup Dialogue: Learning and Teaching Across Difference on Campus and in the Classroom” and the “Art and Practice of Dialogue: A Roundtable Discussion on Rebuilding the American Dream in Our Communities and Schools.”

Friday, February 2

Pedagogy in Ethnic Studies, noon, Room 2433, Mason Hall

Sponsor: Asian/Pacific American Studies within the Program in American Culture, United Asian American Organizations and the Office of Academic Multicultural Initiatives

Join community activists Glenn Omatsu and Debbie Wei in a roundtable discussion on pedagogy in ethnic/Asian Pacific American studies. Gain new insight into the art of teaching from culturally diverse perspectives.

Reflections of the Past: Asian Pacific Americans and Politics, 7 p.m., Anderson Room, Michigan Union

Sponsor: United Asian American Organizations, Asian/Pacific American Studies in the American Culture Program and the Office of Academic Multicultural Initiatives.

Asian Pacific American (APA) community activists Glenn Omatsu and Debbie Wei reflect on their experiences in the civil rights movement and the APA movement. Issues will include APA politics in the context of social movements.

Saturday, February 3

Empowering the Asian Pacific American Community, 11 a.m., Yori Kochiyama Lounge, South Quad

Sponsor: United Asian American Organizations, Asian/Pacific American Studies in the American Culture Program and the Office of Academic Multicultural Initiatives

Glenn Omatsu and Debbie Wei will run a workshop on organizing and activism with the Asian Pacific American community. Come get inspired! Refreshments provided.

Thursday, February 8

Delany, Crowther and the Meaning of “African” Homecoming—A Graduate Student Symposium with Sandra Gunning, 10 a.m., Room 1023, Tisch Hall

Sponsor: Program in the Comparative Study of Social Transformations

Sandra Gunning will discuss Delany, Crowther and the Meaning of “African” Homecoming in a graduate student symposium.

Friday, February 9

K-Grams Kids-Fair, 9 a.m., Crisler Arena

Sponsor: K-Grams

During the course of the year, K-Grams unites U-M students and elementary school students from Ann Arbor, Ypsilanti and Detroit in a rewarding interactive program. The culmination of this yearlong program is Kids-Fair 2001. Kids-Fair brings all of the 1,050 elementary school pen pals to Crisler Arena 9 a.m.–2 p.m. Feb. 9. The event provides a chance for pen pals to meet. Each booth will provide a fun and educational activity for both young and old pen pals to enjoy.

Public Policy and Students of Color—Ernest Wilson, noon, Lorch Hall

Sponsor: Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy

Ernest Wilson has always been an important and effective mentor for students of color. As a member of the Gerald Ford School of Public Policy faculty in the past and currently as a member of the University of Maryland faculty, Wilson is an active participant in the public policy and international affairs summer program that brings students of color to the study of public policy. During his visit, Wilson will have opportunities for conversation and dialogue with students, providing them with informal opportunities to talk about careers, continuing education and other issues of mutual interest.

Thursday, February 15

Movie Screening of Snow Falling on Cedars, 7 p.m., Chrysler Center Auditorium

Sponsor: Tau Beta Pi, Society for Hispanic Professional Engineers and College of Engineering

Set in 1954 on an island in the Pacific Northwest, this haunting tale of love undone by societal pressures and familial customs is an elegant, multi-layered exploration of truth, justice and vagaries of the human heart in this daring cinematic translation of David Guterson’s best-selling novel.

Friday, February 16

Claiming Space: Activism and Affirmation through the Work of Students of Color—11th Annual SCOR Conference, featuring Mary Frances Berry, 8 p.m., Rackham Building

Sponsor: Students of Color of Rackham, the Horace H. Rackham School of Graduate Studies and the Office of Academic Multicultural Initiatives

The Students of Color of Rackham (SCOR) will host the 11th Annual SCOR Conference, “Claiming Space: Activism and Affirmation Through the Work of Students of Color,” Feb. 16–17. The SCOR conference theme acknowledges the contested nature of our intellectual existence, where we advance our scholarly inheritance and invalidate the history of “privileged” entitlement to these sites. Mary Frances Berry, chair of the U.S. Office of Civil Rights and U-M graduate, will deliver the keynote address.

Wednesday, February 21

Mother Ada Wright and the International Campaign to “Free the Scottsboro Boys” Lecture—Susan Pennybacker, 4 p.m., Room 2609, School of Social Work Building

Sponsor: Program in the Comparative Study of Social Transformations (CSST), Atlantic Studies Initiative, Office of the LS&A Dean, Department of History and the Center for Afroamerican and African Studies

Susan Pennybacker, a history professor at Trinity College, will present a lecture on Ada Wright and the International Campaign to “Free the Scottsboro Boys.” This program is part of the CSST Diasporas Colloquium Series.