The University of MichiganNews Services
The University Record Online
search
Updated 10:00 AM June 21, 2004
 

front

accolades

news briefs

events

UM employment


obituaries
police beat
regents round-up
research reporter
letters


archives

Advertise with Record

contact us
meet the staff
contact us
subscribe
 
 
New Mirlyn on the way


A new and improved version of Mirlyn, the Library's online information system, will be available to the campus next month.
Christine Arslanian, a senior psychology major, demonstrates the new version of Mirlyn that will be available after July 12. Features include new search and retrieval capabilities via an easier-to-use interface; the ability to view records in the native characters of more than 20 languages; more powerful searchability to browse authors, titles, subjects and call numbers; customized displays of search results; and more. (Photo by Paul Jaronski, U-M Photo Services)

The system will offer more power and flexibility, while continuing to provide all of the services and features that Library users have come to expect from Mirlyn, says University Librarian William Gosling. This version will replace both the MIRLYNWeb and MIRLYNClassic versions of the current system with a single Web-based interface.

The new Mirlyn will be available to the campus after July 12 at http://mirlyn.lib.umich.edu.

"Users will now have a single point of entry to the Library's rich collections and services, and direct access to research assistance," Gosling says. "The implementation of the new Mirlyn represents a major step forward in the Library's continuing mission to provide exceptional resources and services to our campus community."

The new system will continue to provide access to collections in the 19 facilities comprising the University Library system and the Bentley Historical Library. Additionally, it now will include the Clements and U-M-Flint libraries.

Mirlyn records span all formats of materials from books, journals, film, sound recordings, musical scores, maps and archives, to the growing collection of electronic texts and other digital formats.

Gosling says users can look forward to exploring new search and retrieval capabilities via an easier-to-use interface. A major advancement for scholars in many disciplines will be the ability to view records in the native characters of more than 20 languages, including Chinese, Arabic, Hebrew, Greek, Japanese, Korean and Russian, he says.

Mirlyn also will integrate bibliographic records with digital content more seamlessly; for example, linking from a citation database record directly to the online full text of an article.

Other features include:

• More powerful search ability to browse authors, titles, subjects and call numbers;

• Simple and easy to understand search options, plus new capabilities for searching by journal title, language, date, library location or specific format such as video;

• The ability to see when the next issue of a journal is expected;

• Customized displays of search results for individual needs and preferences;

• Greater ease in downloading and managing records with new tools such as Refworks.

When fully implemented in the fall, the new system also will allow users to search across many of the Library's specialized databases at one time, and to display and sort the results in a single set.

The new program will continue to allow users to see their account information, including what they have checked out; download and e-mail catalog records; find course-related materials; request items for delivery or place a hold on an item; and perform advanced command line searching.

For users who want an introduction and help using the new system, the Library will provide printed handouts and online help, including a link within the new Mirlyn to the Library's virtual reference service, "Ask Us Now." Regular Library classes and workshops also will incorporate an introduction to the new Mirlyn.

The implementation process of more than three years involved specialized teams from the participating libraries and included input from faculty and students.

More Stories