The University of MichiganNews Services
The University Record Online
search
Updated 4:00 PM May 18, 2004
 

front

accolades

news briefs

events

UM employment


obituaries
police beat
regents round-up
research reporter
letters


archives

Advertise with Record

contact us
meet the staff
contact us
subscribe
 
 
Society of Fellows names four new members


The Michigan Society of Fellows has selected four new fellows to serve three-year appointments as postdoctoral scholars and assistant professors, beginning in the fall.

The fellows were chosen for the importance and quality of their scholarship, and for their interest in interdisciplinary intellectual work. During their tenure at U-M, they will teach courses in their affiliated departments and continue their scholarly research.

The new fellows, their affiliated departments and research interests are:

Paul Fine, biology, from the University of Utah; the diversification of Amazonian tree lineages;

Shirli Gilbert, history and music, from the University of Oxford; 1) music and the Holocaust and 2) popular song and the struggle against apartheid;

Eduardo Kohn, anthropology, from the University of Wisconsin-Madison; "Toward an Anthropology of Life";

Ziv Neeman, English, from Columbia University; "Literary Engagements with Computer Programming, 1960-1970."

Fellows appointed in previous years who will continue their affiliation with the Society of Fellows are Charles Davis, biology; Maya Jasanoff, history; Matthew Hull, anthropology; Stella Nair, history of art; Shanan Peters, geological sciences; Neil Safier, history; Megan Williams, Near Eastern studies; and Jonathan Zwicker, Asian languages.

The Society of Fellows was founded in 1970 with grants from the Ford Foundation and the Horace H. and Mary Rackham Funds. The society provides financial and intellectual support to individuals selected for professional promise and interdisciplinary interests. Competition for fellowships is open to eligible candidates in the physical and life sciences, engineering, social sciences, education, the humanities, and the arts.

More Stories