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Updated 11:00 AM November 24, 2003
 

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Class takes focus off fad diets to curb obesity epidemic


In the midst of America's quest to lose weight, obesity is increasing at an astounding rate. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the prevalence of obesity has increased 74 percent since 1991.

The reason? Many "fad" diets only focus on food and overlook a person's mind-body connection to over-eating, experts say. People have emotional attachments to food, and eating elicits responses in the brain that can stimulate the drive to eat.

To take the focus off food and address the root of the problem with over-eating, the U-M Health System (UMHS) Preventive Cardiology Services, part of the Cardiovascular Center, are offering a 12-week workshop with advice about lifelong weight management.

“Many Americans are not eating out of need, but rather out of want."
—Marilyn Migliore

"The diet industry may be overlooking, and in many cases exacerbating, the obesity epidemic by continuing to focus on the symptoms without addressing the underlying causes of our nation's over-eating frenzy," says Marilyn Migliore, cardiovascular nutritionist with the UMHS Preventive Cardiology Program. "Many Americans are not eating out of need, but rather out of want. Our emotional brains' primitive, yet intense drive propels us to use food to subdue, alter and sedate our feelings."

Migliore, author of "The Hunger Within: A Twelve-week Self-Guided Journey from Compulsive Eating to Recovery," facilitates the Hunger Within Workshop. The class is offered in conjunction with Kick the Habit, a smoking cessation program offered by U-M Tobacco Consultation Services.

New classes start Jan. 5 and Jan. 8 at UMHS Preventive Cardiology in Domino's Farms. To enroll call (734) 998-6000 ext. 258.

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