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Updated 10:00 AM October 13, 2003
 

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Regents roundup


Several utilities projects approved

A new chiller plant will be built on North Campus to provide chilled water for air conditioning and cooling heat-generating equipment in many buildings on the campus. The plant will provide energy savings, reduced operating and maintenance costs, and increased redundancy and reliability, while reducing the proliferation of cooling towers and chillers in individual buildings. Currently, the existing buildings have individual chillers, many of which are reaching the end of their useful lives.

The estimated project cost of $14.3 million includes a new 8,000-gross-square-foot building, chiller equipment, pumps and cooling towers, as well as underground piping. Funding will be provided from utility reserves and capital contributions from recently approved building projects.

Three old boilers and a water heater will be replaced with new, higher-efficiency equipment at the Matthaei Botanical Gardens. The project is scheduled to be completed by next summer and is expected to cost $750,000, which will be paid from utility reserves.

Two projects to upgrade equipment at the Central Power Plant (CPP) also were approved. Two steam pressure valves will be replaced and a third valve added next summer. The valves allow for the balancing of steam and electric loading during low electrical demand or unexpected events. The project is estimated to cost $875,000 and will be funded from utility reserves.

Additionally, electrical upgrades on the south side of the CPP are scheduled to be completed by spring. The upgrades include replacement of a 480V transformer and equipment that is more than 50 years old. The electrical project is estimated to cost $750,000 and also will be funded from utility reserves.

Several clinical labs to move to Traverwood

Several clinical laboratories currently in the Medical Sciences I Building will be relocated to the Traverwood II complex on Huron Parkway this winter. Labs for tissue typing, molecular diagnostics and immunology, along with their respective support functions, will be moved after leasehold improvements have been completed at Traverwood. The project is estimated to cost $4.1 million and will be funded from Hospitals and Health Centers' capital resources.

Bidding, construction contracts approved for cyclotron

The regents voted to allow the bidding and awarding of construction contracts to move and upgrade the cyclotron at the Medical School. The project includes replacing the current outdated cyclotron with a newer, more advanced model as well as moving the location from Kresge III to Medical Science I D Wing. The cyclotron will be housed in a new below-ground location that will include laboratory space. The cyclotron produces radioactive tracers which can be targeted to certain parts of the body. It is used in conjunction with a positron emission tomography (PET) scanner in diagnosing cancer, neurological diseases and cardiovascular disease.

Two hospital projects approved

New neuroangiographic equipment that will provide three-dimensional and biplane imaging capability will be installed at University Hospital by next summer. The new technology will allow interventional radiologists to not only make images of blood vessels within the brain, but also to repair those vessels without having to perform an open-skull brain operation. The project is estimated to cost $3.3 million, which includes renovations of 940 gross square feet of space and $2.5 million for equipment.

Six recovery bays for University Hospital patients undergoing medical procedures will be added on Level B1 by spring 2004, which will allow a temporary recovery unit on Level 7B to be returned to inpatient use. The project is estimated to cost $930,000.

Both projects will be funded from Hospitals and Health Centers' capital resources.

Three building projects to be bid

Three building projects received approval to be issued for bids and the awarding of contracts, providing the bids are within the approved budget. The regents had approved schematic designs for the projects at earlier meetings—a major renovation project to the LSA Building was approved in March, a new Computer Science and Engineering Building in April, and an addition and renovation to the Advanced Technologies Laboratories Building for the Biomedical Engineering project in June.

Each project is expected to be completed in 2006.

Appointments with tenure

Arun Agrawal, associate professor of natural resources and environment, School of Natural Resources and Environment, effective Sept. 1, 2003.

Gregg Crane, associate professor of English language and literature, LSA, effective Sept. 1, 2003.

Dr. Thomas Giordano, associate professor of pathology, Medical School, effective Sept. 1, 2003.

Kyle Grazier, professor of health management and policy, School of Public Health, effective Sept. 1, 2003.

James Lee, professor of Chinese history, LSA, effective Sept. 1, 2003.

Dirk Obbink, professor of classical studies, LSA, effective Sept. 1, 2003.

Dr. Scott Ransom, associate professor of obstetrics and gynecology, Medical School, effective Sept. 1, 2003.

Rachel Snow, associate professor of health behavior and health education, School of Public Health, effective Sept. 1, 2003.

Richard Lee Turits, associate professor of history and associate professor of Afroamerican and African studies, LSA, effective Sept. 1, 2003.

Sijue Wu, professor of mathematics, LSA, effective Sept. 1, 2003.

Carroll Smith-Rosenberg, professor of history, professor of women's studies, professor of American culture, LSA, effective Sept. 1, 2003.

Named professorships

Virginia Young, Cecil J. and Ethel M. Nesbitt Professor of Actuarial Mathematics, and professor of mathematics, LSA, effective Sept. 1, 2003.

Christopher Achen, Warren E. Miller Collegiate Professor of Political Science, LSA, effective Sept. 1, 2003-Aug. 31, 2008.

Dr. Steven Bolling, Gayle Halperin Kahn Professor of Integrative Medicine, Medical School, effective Aug. 1, 2003-July 31, 2008.

Heather Carlson, reappointed John Gideon Searle Assistant Professor of Medicinal Chemistry, College of Pharmacy, effective Aug. 1, 2003-July 31, 2006.

Zhan Chen, Dow Corning Assistant Professor of Chemistry, LSA, effective Sept. 1, 2003-May 31, 2006.

Rodney Ewing, Donald R. Peacor Collegiate Professor of Geological Sciences, professor of geological sciences, LSA, effective July 1, 2004-June 30, 2009.

Michael Falk, Dow Corning Assistant Professor of Materials Science and Engineering, College of Engineering, effective Sept. 1, 2003-Aug. 31, 2006.

Thomas Gladwin, reappointed Max McGraw Professorship in Sustainable Enterprise, Business School, effective Sept. 1, 2003-Aug. 31, 2008.

George Kenyon, reappointed Tom D. Rowe Collegiate Professor of Pharmacy, College of Pharmacy, effective Sept. 1, 2003-Aug. 31, 2008.

Lawrence Pintak, Howard R. Marsh Visiting Professor of Journalism, LSA, effective Sept. 1, 2003-May 31, 2004.

Rudy Richardson, reappointed Dow Professor of Toxicology, School of Public Health, effective Oct. 1, 2003-Sept. 30, 2008.

Administrative appointments

William Gosling, renamed university librarian, University Library, effective Dec. 1, 2003-Nov. 30, 2008.

Valener Perry, renamed assistant dean for student services, College of Pharmacy, effective Sept. 1, 2003-Aug. 31, 2008.

Sherril Smith, renamed associate dean for graduate studies, School of Art & Design, effective July 1, 2003-June 30, 2004.

Dr. Valerie Castle, chair, Department of Pediatrics and Communicable Diseases, Medical School, effective Sept. 1, 2003.

Dr. Lisa Colletti, associate dean for graduate medical education, Medical School, effective Sept. 1, 2003.

Philip Deloria, director, Program in American Culture, LSA, effective Jan. 1, 2004-June 30, 2006.

James Driscoll, interim chair, Department of Aerospace Engineering, College of Engineering, effective Sept. 1, 2003.

Deborah Goldberg, chair, Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, LSA, effective Sept. 1, 2003-June 30, 2006.

Jill Becker Luma, associate dean for academic affairs, LSA, effective Aug. 1, 2003-July 31, 2004.

Susan Nolen-Hoeksema, director, Institute for Research on Women and Gender, Office of the Vice President for Research, effective Aug. 1, 2003-July 31, 2005.

David Schottenfeld, interim chair, Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, effective July 1, 2003.

Dr. Thomas Carli, assistant dean for clinical affairs, Medical School, effective Sept. 18, 2003.

Eric Dey, executive associate dean, School of Education, effective July 1, 2002-July 31, 2004.

Allen Lichter, reappointed dean, Medical School, effective May 1, 2004-April 30, 2009.

David Mindell, director, Herbarium, and director, Museum of Zoology, LSA, effective Sept. 1, 2003-Aug. 31, 2004.

Jefferson Porter, assistant vice president for development, University Development Office, effective July 1, 2003.

U-M-Dearborn

Neil Flax, chair, Department of Humanities, effective July 1, 2003-June 30, 2004.

U-M-Flint

Tevfik Nas, chair, Department of Economics, effective Aug. 1, 2003-June 30, 2006.

Margaret Kahn, David M. French Professor, effective July 1, 2003-June 30, 2005.

Retirements

Anthony Aguirre, librarian in the University Library, effective Aug. 29, 2003. He joined the faculty as a librarian in 1993. Aguirre was part of the University group that designed Web pages related to nursing, genetics, dentistry and public health/health administration for HealthWeb. He shepherded a major and complex renovation of the Taubman Medical Library, completed in 2002. Aguirre was a member of the board of directors of the U-M Historical Center for Health Sciences and a member of the Committee on Institutional Cooperation Board of Directors for HealthWeb.

Dr. Giles Bole Jr., dean emeritus and professor of internal medicine in the Medical School, effective Feb. 28, 2003. He joined the faculty in 1959. As dean of the Medical School, Bole introduced a highly successful new curriculum, oversaw construction of new research buildings, and revitalized many of the clinical and basic science departments with new chair recruitments and resources. He developed new interdisciplinary programs such as the U-M Cancer Center. Bole served as chair of the Midwest section of the American Federation for Clinical Research, president of the Michigan Rheumatism Society, president of the Central Society for Clinical Research and president of the American Rheumatism Association.

Eddie Boyd, associate professor of pharmacy in the College of Pharmacy and clinical pharmacist at the University Hospitals, effective Aug. 31, 2003. He joined the faculty in 1971. Boyd played an important role in the development of the clinical pharmacy program and was instrumental in establishing new clinical practice sites for ambulatory care students. Though his research focused on a variety of issues, Boyd particularly was interested in the use of alternative medicines among African Americans. Boyd was an active member of the Michigan Board of Pharmacy for many years and was influential in resolving pharmacy law issues within Michigan. Recently he was honored with a Career Service Award by the Association of Black Professionals, Administrators, Faculty, and Staff at the University.

William Burkel, professor of cell and developmental biology in the Medical School, effective Oct. 4, 2003. He joined the faculty in 1966. From 1990-2000, Burkel was the director of the Anatomical Donations Program. The program became a model of integrity and efficiency throughout the country, regents said. Active in educational development, Burkel co-authored several editions of Woodburne's Essentials of Human Anatomy and had a leading role in the development of the ATLAS program for computer-based instruction in anatomy, and the Computer-Assisted Instructional Laboratory.

John Downey, associate librarian in the University Library, effective July 31, 2003. He joined U-M in 1974. Downey is a long-time member of the Middle East Librarians Association, a professional association for librarians who specialize in Middle East librarianship. He was an early contributor to the North American Union Catalogue of Middle Eastern Serials and the Ottoman Turkish Documentation Project cooperative between Yale University, the University of Chicago, U-M and Princeton University. Downey's invaluable contributions to the library's illustrious Near Eastern collections, especially its Persian language collection, have benefited countless scholars and graduate students.

Dr. Richard Fisher, associate professor of dentistry in the School of Dentistry, effective June 30, 2003. He joined the faculty in 1969. During his career, Fisher has participated fully in the department's didactic and clinical instruction for undergraduate, pre-doctoral and graduate students. He has served on many School of Dentistry committees, including the Appointments, Promotions, and Tenure Committee; the Clinic Operations Committee; the Curriculum Committee; the Academic Review Board; the Student Affairs Committee; and the Emergency and Resuscitation Committee.

Joseph Marino, professor of chemistry in LSA and professor of medicinal chemistry in the College of Pharmacy, effective May 31, 2003. He joined the University in 1969. Marino's research focused on the development of new synthetic methods in organic and medicinal chemistry. He directed 36 doctoral students at U-M and an additional nine doctoral students at the University of Sao Paulo, Brazil, where he was a Fulbright lecturer and researcher, and developed ongoing research collaborations. In recognition of his work in Brazil, he was elected in 1990 as a foreign member of the Brazilian National Academy of Science.

Vonnie McLoyd, professor of psychology and Afroamerican and African studies in LSA, effective Aug. 31, 2003. She joined the faculty in 1978. McLoyd received a MacArthur Fellowship in 1996. She also received the Teuben Hill Award from the national Council of Family Relations, a Faculty Scholar Award in Child Mental Health from the William T. Grant Foundation, and a minority-group scholar fellowship from the Rockefeller Foundation. McLoyd's scholarship helped shape the field of developmental psychology as her interest evolved from traditional developmental psychology to a more expansive and creative view of the field.

Tong-Wha Shyn, research scientist in the College of Engineering, effective Dec. 31, 2002. He joined the University in 1969. During his career, Shyn maintained an active research program in atomic and molecular physics. He collaborated with numerous investigators in the Space Physics Research Laboratory to provide cross-section measurements of interest, and he published his results extensively in the Physical Review journals of the American Physical Society. Shyn has been an active member of the Korean Scientists and Engineers of America and served as the president of the Michigan chapter.

James Taylor, professor of marketing in the Business School, effective June 30, 2003. Taylor joined the University in 1967. A dedicated teacher and scholar, Taylor's research activities include a needs-based market segmentation project, which explored new concepts in needs-based segmentation and the implications for market-based strategies. Taylor has been a strong teacher in many areas. He was one of the senior faculty members in the executive education program, where he taught the acclaimed Competitive Marketing course.

William Weissert, professor of health management and policy and chair of the Department of Health Management and Policy in the School of Public Health, and senior research scientist in the Institute of Gerontology, effective July 31, 2003. He joined U-M in 1989. Weissert evaluated the limitations of long-term care insurance and the potential for using home equity to pay for it, and his descriptions of two models of adult day care provided the basic taxonomy for the newly developing care venue. His best-known work addressed the cost-effectiveness of home care services and recommended payment methods to improve efficiency and effectiveness. Weissert is recognized as one of the top researchers in long-term care and aging.

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