The University Record, January 11, 1993

Martin Luther King Day 1993

1993 MLK Day Symposium

"From Indifference and Inequality To Justice and Reconciliation"

A Commemorative Symposium and Related Events

Sponsored by the Office of the Vice Provost for Minority Affairs, The University of Michigan

All events are free and open to the public.

January 17

"An Evening with Langston and Martin," readings from the lives of Langston Hughes and Martin Luther King Jr, Danny Glover and Felix Justice. 7 p.m., Hill Auditorium. Reception precedes, 5:30--6:30 p.m., Michigan League.

January 18

OPENING ADDRESS: Bebe Moore Campbell, author, Sweet Summer: Growing Up With and Without My Dad, and Your Blues Ain't Mine; contributing writer, Essence magazine. 11 a.m., Power Center for the Performing Arts

CLOSING ADDRESS: Julianne Malveaux, economist and syndicated columnist; writer, San Francisco Sun reporter and contributing writer, Essence magazine. 7:30 p.m., Power Center.

MLK Symposium Planning Committee Events

January 18

9--11 a.m., Lecture/Discussion with King/Chávez/Parks High School Students, Joan Morgan, writer, The Village Voice; Darrell Dawsey, writer, The Detroit News. Angell Hall, Auditorium B.

9--11 a.m., "Executive Summary: Total Quality Management and Diversity," Wayne Wormley, American Institute for Managing Diversity Inc. Vandenburg Room, Michigan League.

9--11 a.m., "Conflict Resolution in South Africa," Dudley Weeks, director, Future Links. Michigan Union.

1:30--3 p.m., Workshop---"Building and Improving African-Centered Organizations & Institutions," Haki R. Madhubuti, The Third World Press Inc. Modern Languages Building, Auditorium 3.

1:30--3 p.m., "Creating Multicultural Spaces: Student Voices." A panel of intergroup dialogue facilitators talk about their experiences working with differences on campus. Program on Intergroup Relations and Conflict. Anderson Rooms, Michigan Union.

3 p.m.--6 p.m., Future Links---Conflict Resolution in South Africa. Lecture to be followed by dialogue groups. Pendleton Room, Michigan Union.

3--4:30 p.m., "Reflections on the Past: Building A Vision For the Future." Edison O. Jackson, president, Medgar Evers College, Brookyln, New York; Michael McQuillan, adviser, Office of Racial and Ethnic Affairs, Office of the Brooklyn Borough President. Modern Languages Building, Auditorium 4.

3:20--4:50, "Nationalist Organizing and the Role of Students in Struggle," Minister Khallid Muhammad, Nation of Islam; Errol Henderson, political scientist. Modern Languages Building, Auditorium #3.

5--7 p.m., Renewing Our Connections: A Dialogue Among Peoples of Color: African Americans, Asian Americans, Latinos(as) and Native Americans, Program on Intergroup Relations and Conflict. Mason Hall, Rooms 2447-2450.

5--7 p.m., Building Bridges: An Intergroup Dialogue between People of Color and White People, Program on Intergroup Relations and Conflict.

5:15--7 p.m., "1963 to 1993: The Organization and Extension of African-Centered Revolutionary Nationalism," Chokwe Lumumba, president, New Afrikan Peoples Organization; Chimba Omari, Paul Robeson Center, Detroit. Modern Languages Building, Auditorium 3.

UNIT-SPONSORED EVENTS

(All programs are free and open to the public unless otherwise noted.)

JANUARY 14

University Musical Society

Community Sing and Workshop. The Urban Bush Women. Workshop exploring African American singing traditions and vocalization styles including excerpts from the company's repertoire. Host choir: Renaissance High School Varsity Choir. Northwest Activities Center, 18100 Myers Road, Detroit.

CENTER FOR RESEARCH ON SOCIAL ORGANIZATION

Consequences of the L.A. Riots. Harold Cruse, professor emeritus of history and of Afroamerican and African studies. N noon--1 p.m., Room 4051, LS&A Building.

JANUARY 14--16

SIGMA GAMMA RHO

Co-sponsored by Office of the Vice President for Student Affairs, Horace H. Rackham School of Graduate Studies, Michigan Student Assembly, LS&A Student Government, Center for Afroamerican and African Studies, Comprehensive Studies Program, LS&A, Office of Vice Provost for Minority Affairs, Department of English, Department of Theatre, Panhellenic Association, Center for the Education of Women, Women's Studies Program.

Performance: "for coloured girls who have considered suicide when the rainbow is enuf." 8 p.m., Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre. $6 general admission, $5 students.

JANUARY 15

DEPARTMENT OF SLAVIC LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES

Jews and Ukrainians: Steps to Resolving Ethnic Tensions. Assaya Humesky, professor of Slavic languages and literatures. 3--5 p.m., 3rd floor Conference Room, Modern Languages Building.

UNIVERSITY MUSICAL SOCIETY

Community Sing. The Urban Bush Women. Host choir: Ypsilanti High School Choir. 7 p.m., Hussey Room, Michigan League.

JANUARY 16

UNIVERSITY MUSICAL SOCIETY

Performance. The Urban Bush Women. 8 p.m., Power Center for the Performing Arts. Call 764-2538 for ticket information.

JANUARY 17

LANGUAGE RESOURCE CENTER

King: A Filmed Record. 7--9 p.m., 2nd floor, Modern Languages Building.

UNIVERSITY MUSICAL SOCIETY

Performance. The Urban Bush Women. 3 p.m., Power Center for Performing Arts. Call 764-2538 for ticket information.

JANUARY 18

21ST CENTURY PROGRAM

Innovative Techniques in Workshops and Seminars. Panel discussion with faculty, students and staff of the program. 9--10 a.m., Ostafin Room, West Quad.

AMERICAN CULTURE

Multiculturalism and American Studies. Panel discussion. 9:30 a.m., Room 410G, Mason Hall.

ANTHROPOLOGY

Lecture TBA. Theresa Singleton, associate curator, Smithsonian Institution. 4 p.m., Auditorium C, Angell Hall.

ARCHITECTURE AND URBAN PLANNING

Co-sponsored by Organization of African Americans in Art.

Symposium on the Rural Environment: "Directions Toward Change." LaBarbara Wigfall, professor, Kansas State University, and Kenneth Hodge, Housing Assistance Council, Washington, D.C. 9 a.m.--3 p.m., North Campus Commons.

SCHOOL OF ART

"Wake-up" breakfast buffet followed by informal panel discussion of School of Art culture: who we are, where we're from and ow identity informs the creative process. Open to the public. 8 a.m., Room 2216, Art & Architecture Building.

ASIAN LANGUAGES AND CULTURES

Co-spnsored by Center for Chinese Studies, Center for Japanese Studies, Center for South and Southeast Asian Studies.

Asian Studies and Asians in America. Speaker TBA, followed by panel discussion with invited guests from the community. 1--3 p.m., Room 3050, Frieze Building.

BLACK ARTS COUNCIL

Hold Fast to Dreams. Performance. 7 p.m., Rackham Auditorium.

BLACK STUDENT UNION

Annual Unity March. Noon, corner of South and East University. Speeches follow on Diag.

SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

Unity Through Diversity. Shirley Chisholm, co-founder, Political Congress of Black Women. 10 a.m., Hale Auditorium, Assembly Hall.

CAREER PLANNING AND PLACEMENT

Job Searching in a Diverse Work Force. Information display. 8 a.m.--5 p.m., Room 3200, Student Activities Building, through January 29.

CENTER FOR AFROAMERICAN AND AFRICAN STUDIES

Co-spnsored by the William L. Clements Library.

African American Folk Tales. LaRon Williams and Elizabeth James. 1--2 p.m., William L. Clements Library.

CENTER FOR AFROAMERICAN AND AFRICAN STUDIES (CAAS)

Co-sponsored by the Office of the Vice President for Development.

No Justice, No Peace? Race and Difference in a Global Society. Earl Lewis, CAAS director. 9:30--10:45 a.m., Alumni Center.

DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNICATION

Emerging Media Images: Then and Now. Panel discussion, moderator: Jimmie Reeves, assistant professor. 8:30 a.m., Location TBA.

DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS

Economic Analysis and Race. Speaker TBA. 9:30--11 a.m., Room 201, Lorch Hall.

ENGLISH COMPOSITION BOARD

PRISM: Diverse Perspectives from a University Community. Forum of PRISM contributors discussing how it impacts the Michigan Mandate. 8:30--10 a.m., Kuenzel Room, Michigan Union.

ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LINGUISTICS PROGRAM

Perspectives on Being a Minority Speaker of the Language of the Majority. Panel: Elizabeth Axelson, lecturer, English Language Institute; Andre Cooper, assistant professor, linguistics, Joan Morley, associate professor, linguistics and ELI. 9--11 a.m., Room 3050 Frieze Building.

DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGICAL SCIENCES

Marilyn J. Suiter, American Geological Institute. Title, time and location TBA.

DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY

Presentation on the Civil Rights Movement. Mills Thornton. 9--10 a.m., William L. Clements Library.

DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY OF ART

African Art and the Diaspora: Program I. Discussion leader: Sharon Patton, associate professor. 3--5 p.m., Room 180, Tappan Hall.

INSTITUTE FOR SOCIAL RESEARCH

Moving Beyond Tolerance. Discussion facilitator: Andrea Monroe-Fowler, coordinator of multicultural programs, ISR. noon--2:30 p.m., Location TBA.

INSTITUTE OF PUBLIC POLICY STUDIES

Readings: A Reaffirmation of the Ideals of Martin Luther King. IPPS Students, faculty and staff. 10 a.m., Askwith Auditorium, Lorch Hall.

INTEFLEX PROGRAM

Bulletin Board Exhibition of Relevant Quotations. Location TBA.

KINESIOLOGY

Race and Schooling of Black Americans. Kinesiology faculty members. Time TBA, Room 1250 Central Campus Recreation Building.

LANGUAGE RESOURCE CENTER

King: A Filmed Record. 9--11 a.m. and 7--9 p.m., 2nd floor, Modern Languages Building.

LAW SCHOOL

Race and the Jury System: The Rodney King Verdict. Phoebe Ellsworth, Samuel Gross, Debra Livingston, Theodore M. Shaw, all professors of law.

MUSEUM OF ART

Films: My Hands Are the Tools of My Soul: Art and Poetry of the American Indian and Richard Hunt: Outdoor Sculpture. 10--11:30 a.m., Museum of Art Classroom.

OFFICE OF AFFIRMATIVE ACTION

MLK Film Fest and Panel Discussion. Films: In Remembrance of Martin, 9 a.m.; MLK: A Personal Portrait, 10 a.m.; No Easy Walk, 11 a.m.; The Issue Is Race, noon--2 p.m., followed by panel discussion of staff, students and administrators. Pond Rooms, Michigan Union.

DEPARTMENT OF PHARMACOLOGY

Co-sponsored by the Departments of Anatomy, Biological Chemistry, Human Genetics and Physiology; Mental Health Research Institute; Postgraduate Medicine and Health Professions Education; and Unit for Laboratory Animal Medicine.

Role of Pharmacogenetics in Human Health, Frank Gonzalez, head, Nucleic Acids Section, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health. 2 p.m. (tentative), Sheldon Auditorium, Towsley Center.

DEPARTMENT OF PHILOSOPHY

Why Punish Demeaning Expression. Anita Allen, associate professor, Georgetown University Law Center. 3--5p.m., Auditorium B, Angell Hall.

POPULATION STUDIES CENTER

Comparative Perspectives on Race and Ethnicity: the U.S., Brazil, the former Soviet Union, and China. Barbara Anderson, director, Population Studies Center, and professor of sociology; David Lam, associate professor of economics and director, Economic Demography; David Williams, assistant professor of sociology and research scientist, Institute for Social Research. 9:30 a.m., Main Conference Room, Population Studies Center, 1125 South University.

PROGRAM IN FILM AND VIDEO STUDIES

Screening of Julie Dash's Daughters of the Dust. 6 p.m., Michigan Theater.

DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHOLOGY

Co-sponsored by the University Center for Child and Family.

Families and Children in Need: The Unified Dream. Panel discussion. 8:30--10 a.m., University Center for Child and Family.

HORACE H. RACKHAM SCHOOL OF GRADUATE STUDIES AND BLACK ARTS COUNCIL

MLK Morning Celebration: Hold Fast to Dreams. Black Arts Council, School of Music, and George Shirley, professor of music and voice. 8:30--9:30 a.m., breakfast/gallery showing; 9:30--11 a.m., program. Rackham Auditorium.

RESIDENTIAL COLLEGE

A Multicultural Curriculum in the Residential College. Speaker TBA. 11 a.m., East Quad Auditorium.

DEPARTMENT OF ROMANCE LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES

On Race and Racism in Romance Studies. Panel of graduate students: Bridget Morgan, Michelle Chilcoat, Roger Gutler-Borruat and Jon Heaton, doctoral candidates in French and Spanish. 9--10:45 a.m., Commons Lounge, 4th floor, Modern Languages Building.

SCHOOL OF ART

Considering Difference in the Art School. Panel Discussion, speakers TBA. 8--11 a.m., Room 2216-19, Art and Architecture Building.

SCHOOL OF NATURAL RESOURCES AND ENVIRONMENT

From Inequality and Indifference to Justice and Reconciliation. Mamie Parker, chief, Division of Habitat Conservation, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Division of Enhancement. 9:30--11 a.m., Room 1040, Dana Building.

SCHOOL OF NURSING

Co-sponsored by Schools of Dentistry and Public Health, Medical School, University Hospitals and Office of the Vice Provost for Medical Affairs.

Equality and Justice: Women's Unfinished Health Care Agenda. Faye Wattleton, talk show host and past president, Planned Parenthood. 1:30--3:30 p.m., Rackham Auditorium.

SCHOOL OF SOCIAL WORK

Sin of Omission: African American Women in Social Work. Audreye E. Johnson, associate professor, School of Social Work, University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, and founding member, National Association of Black Social Workers. 10 a.m.---noon, Location TBA.

UNIVERSITY LIBRARY

Making a Difference: Libraries as Society's Equalizers. Gloria Naylor, author, Women of Brewster Place, Mamaday, Baily's Cafe. Time TBA, Michigan Union Ballroom.

UNIVERSITY MUSICAL SOCIETY

Community Sing. The Urban Bush Women. 3 p.m., Vandenburg Room, Michigan League.

JANUARY 19

CAREER PLANNING AND PLACEMENT

Job Searching in a Diverse Workforce. Speaker TBA. 4:10-5:30 p.m., Room 3200, Student Activities Building.

JANUARY 21

CENTER FOR RESEARCH ON SOCIAL ORGANIZATION

We Are Not What We Seem: Rethinking Black Working Class Opposition in the 20th Century. Robin Kelley, associate professor of history and of Afroamerican and African history. Noon--1 p.m., Room 4051, LS&A Building.

JANUARY 28

CENTER FOR RESEARCH ON SOCIAL ORGANIZATION

Job Opportunities in a Changing Society: Prospects for Minority Ph.D.s in the Year 2000. Donald Deskins, professor of urban geography and sociology. Noon--1 p.m., Room 4051 LS&A Building.

FEBRUARY 9

CENTER FOR MIDDLE EASTERN AND NORTH AFRICAN STUDIES

Co-sponsors: Center for Chinese Studies, Center for Japanese Studies, Center for Russian and East European Studies, Center for Afroamerican and African Studies (CAAS).

New World Disorder: Dissolving Borders and Homeless Nations. Donald Lopez, professor of Buddhist and Tibetan studies; Rudolph Mrazek, assistant professor of history; Eva Huseby-Darvas, visiting professor of anthropology; Fatme Muge Gocek, assistant professor of sociology; Gary Saxonhouse, professor of economics; CAAS speaker TBA. 3--5 p.m., Rackham Amphitheater.