The University Record, April 11, 1994

IN BRIEF

Orientation programs focus on China, Eastern Europe

The Center for Chinese Studies, the Center for Russian and East European Studies (CREES) and the William Davidson Institute will offer separate intensive orientation courses on China, the Czech Republic, Hungary, Poland and Slovakia May 4–13.

Each orientation program provides an overview of the political, social and economic transition taking place in the post-communist era, as well as each country’s rich culture and history. The programs, taught by leading scholars in the field, are designed for graduate level student interns in the Business School’s MBA Corps and the William Davidson Institute’s Internship Programs and also are open to individuals interested in learning about these countries for the purpose of doing business or conducting research.

Individuals from the academic community (including students) may participate in any of the orientation programs for a $450 registration fee, which includes a course-pack, other texts and a cultural event. For others, the fee is $1,000. The registration fee doesn’t include meals, transportation or housing.

For reservations, send a registration form and a non-refundable $50 fee by Fri. (April 15) to Marga Miller, CREES, 204 Lane Hall. For information, call Miller, 747-2213, or Pat O’Connell-Young about the China Orientation Program, 747-1487.

Turner program focuses on ‘Perspectives on World War II’

Turner Geriatric Services’ Learning in Retirement (LIR) program “Perspectives on World War II” begins with a lecture by Kenneth Slepyan, doctoral candidate in history, on “the Great Patriotic War or a National Tragedy? Soviet Experiences, 1941–45” at 10 a.m. Thurs. (April 14) in the Kellogg Eye Center Auditorium.

The program, which commemorates the 50th anniversary of D-Day, consists of five lectures and one session about experiences of LIR members.

Other lectures scheduled: April 21, “The German War and the German People” by Peter Caldwell, visiting lecturer in history; April 28, “The American Presence on the British Home Front” by Sonya Rose, professor of history and sociology; May 5, personal narratives by LIR members; May 12, “The View from Japan” by Roger Hackett, professor emeritus of history; and May 26, “The ‘Good War’: The American Home Front in World War II” by Sidney Fine, professor of history.

The fee is $20. For information, call 764-2556, mornings.

Regents will meet this week

The Regents’ Meeting begins at 2 p.m. Thurs. (April 14) in the Regents’ Room, Fleming Administration Bldg. The meeting will be closed immediately pursuant to the Open Meetings Act. Public comments will begin at 4 p.m. in the Anderson Room, Michigan Union. The meeting will reconvene at 9 a.m. Fri. (April 15) in the Regents’ Room. Agenda items include the 1995–96 and 1996–97 academic calendars for the Ann Arbor campus, reorganization of the School of Public Health and plans for proposed buildings.

LS&A faculty meet today

Ctirad Uher, associate dean for research, computing and facilities, will present an “Update on Central Campus Renovations” at the LS&A faculty meeting that begins at 4:10 a.m. today (April 11) in Auditorium B, Angell Hall.

Also on the agenda are a report about the College’s Joint Student-Faculty Policy Committee and votes on changes in the Faculty Code regarding the pass-fail option, boards of study and the English Composition Board.

For the record ...

The Benefits Office will offer GradCare information sessions 3–4:30 p.m. Wed. (April 13) in the East Conference Room, Rackham Bldg., and 8:30–10 a.m. Thurs. (April 14) in Room 1311, Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Bldg. The location for the Thursday meeting was incorrect in the April 4 Record.

Benefit Reimbursement Account cutoffs

To guarantee reimbursement in their April paycheck, Flexible Spending Account participants should submit claims to the Benefits Office, 2030 Administrative Services Bldg., by April 19 for bi-weekly and monthly pay periods.

Benefits report coming soon

The annual report on benefits will be mailed to staff members this week. The report summarizes the benefit programs in which staff members participate and provides a statement of the costs of those benefits to both staff members and the University.

Benefits shown are based on staff members’ personal situation as of Dec. 31, with the exception of health insurance benefit reimbursement accounts, and basic retirement allocations, where the status as of Jan. 1 was used. Any plan participation or appointment changes since then will not be shown on the statement.

The Benefits Office encourages staff members to review the report for accuracy. For information or questions about possible inaccuracies, call 763-1214 (Central Campus) or 764-6584 (Medical Campus).

Chamber Choir will perform Argento work April 15

An unusual, Easter-related piece by Dominick Argento will highlight a free concert by the Chamber Choir at 8 p.m. Fri. (April 15) in Hill Auditorium.

Argento, professor of music at the Uni-versity of Minnesota, wrote Tria Carmina Paschalia (Three Latin Easter Lyrics) in 1971. It is scored for a three-part women’s choir, guitar and harp.

Also on the program are works for mixed choir by Brahms, Schubert and Beadell, all to be conducted by Theodore Morrison.

Documentary showing will benefit battered women

Screenings of From One Prison, a new documentary by Carol Jacobsen about four women serving life sentences in a Michigan prison, will be held 7 p.m. and 9 p.m. Sat. (April 16) in the Natural Science Auditorium, Kraus Bldg.

Admission is $5. Proceeds will benefit the Michigan Battered Women’s Clemency Project. Susan Fair, director of the project, will lead an audience discussion at 8:15 p.m.

The screenings are sponsored by the Ann Arbor Film Co-op.

Documentary showing will benefit battered women

Screenings of From One Prison, a new documentary by Carol Jacobsen about four women serving life sentences in a Michigan prison, will be held 7 p.m. and 9 p.m. Sat. (April 16) in the Natural Science Auditorium, Kraus Bldg.

Admission is $5. Proceeds will benefit the Michigan Battered Women’s Clemency Project. Susan Fair, director of the project, will lead an audience discussion at 8:15 p.m.

The screenings are sponsored by the Ann Arbor Film Co-op.

Health Night Out will focus on repetitive motion injuries

“Breaking the Cycle of Repetitive Motion Injuries (RMI)” is the topic of the Medical Center’s Health Night Out program 7:30–9:30 p.m. Tues. (April 12) in Kellogg Eye Center Auditorium.

Physicians J. Steven Schultz and Robert A. Werner will lead the program. RMI can disable anyone who performs the same motion everyday. Participants will learn how improper technique, faulty posture and muscle inflexibility can lead to RMI. The program and parking are free. For information, call U-M TeleCare, 763-9000, category 1075.

UROP sponsors symposium

The Undergraduate Research Opportunities Program (UROP) will hold its annual Spring Research Symposium 5–7 p.m. Wed. (April 13) in Hale Auditorium, School of Business Administration Bldg. The symposium will include oral and poster presentations by student participants. Research project topics include: Expression of Hepatitis C Virus: Looking for a Cure; Environmental Diversity in Early Humans; Modifiability of Cognitive Deficits in Schizophrenics; and Reversal of Place Preference Using Naloxone. Refreshments will be served.

Premarital health certification class offered April 14

Couples applying for a marriage license in Michigan are required to have counseling on transmission and prevention of sexually transmitted diseases and to have testing offered to them. The requirement can be fulfilled by attending a class 6:30–7:30 p.m. Thurs. (April 14) at the U-M Health Center, 9398 Lilley Road, Plymouth. The course fee is $20 per person or $35 per couple. To pre-register, call 459-0820.

Business and Finance will hold M-Quality Forum

The Business and Finance Division will present the first M-Quality Forum for team leaders and facilitators 8:30 a.m.–noon April 29 at the Michigan Union. The program will include concurrent education sessions and a reception. Division team leaders and facilitators need to register by Fri. (April 15). Persons who have not received their invitation should call Annette Schmidt, 764-1160.

Architect will discuss ‘Turkish Houses’

Istanbul architect Cengiz Bektas will talk about “Turkish Houses” at 4 p.m. Thurs. (April 14) in the East Conference Room, Rackham Bldg. Bektas’ buildings are considered exemplary of the Republican period and contemporary Turkish architecture. The event is sponsored by the Turkish Studies Colloquium and the Center for Middle Eastern and North African Studies. For information, call 764-0350.

Borgman will discuss library of the future

Christine Borgman, professor at the Graduate School of Library and Information Science at the University of California, Los Angeles, will discuss “The Library of the Future: Information Seeking in the Networked World” 1–3 p.m. Fri. (April 15) in the Ehrlicher Room, 411 W. Engineering Bldg.

Borgman teaches courses in human-computer communications, library automation, online searching, systems analysis, scholarly communication, bibliometrics and social issues in the use of information technology. Her free lecture is sponsored by the School of Information and Library Studies.

Borgman will discuss library of the future

Christine Borgman, professor at the Graduate School of Library and Information Science at the University of California, Los Angeles, will discuss “The Library of the Future: Information Seeking in the Networked World” 1–3 p.m. Fri. (April 15) in the Ehrlicher Room, 411 W. Engineering Bldg.

Borgman teaches courses in human-computer communications, library automation, online searching, systems analysis, scholarly communication, bibliometrics and social issues in the use of information technology. Her free lecture is sponsored by the School of Information and Library Studies.

Museum of Art offers tours

Free, hour-long tours of special exhibitions and works from the Museum of Art’s permanent collection are scheduled April 17 (Cubism and its Influence) and April 24 (Whistler). Tours begin at 2 p.m. at the Museum’s information desk.

Design Expo slated for April 19

The University community is invited to attend Design Expo ’94 11 a.m.–6 p.m. April 19 in the Atrium of the Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Bldg. Design Expo ’94 features working prototypes created by students in the senior mechanical engineering design course. Students will demonstrate their prototypes, which are solutions to real-life engineering problems.

Violinist Xiang Gao will perform April 12

The University Symphony Orchestra will conclude its 1993–94 season with a free concert at 8 p.m. Tues. (April 12) in Hill Auditorium. The program will feature Saint-Saens’ Violin Concerto No. 3 by School of Music junior Xiang Gao, who won first place in the School of Music’s 1994 concerto competition.

Gao, who was born in Beijing, studied at that city’s Central Conservatory of Music, where in 1990 he won the senior prize in the China National Violin Competition.

Srirama will perform Indian classical dance

Malini Srirama & Co. will perform Indian classical dancing 6–8 p.m. Fri. (April 15) in the East Room, North Campus Commons. The performance is sponsored by the International Coffee House, the International Center and North Campus Commons Arts & Programs. It is funded by the Michigan Humanities Council.

Srirama also will give an Indian dance lecture and demonstration noon–1 p.m. Tues. (April 12) in Room 1524, Rackham Bldg. The program is part of the Institute for the Humanities’ brown bag series.

Arb Gear on sale during Earth Week

Arb Gear, a line of clothing and gift items developed by the Friends of Nichols Arboretum, will be on sale at 20 percent off their regular prices during Earth Week, April 17–23.

Sweatshirts, t-shirts, bandanas and notecards are available at the School of Natural Resources and Environment, Room 1528, Dana Bldg. 8 a.m.-noon and 1–5 p.m. weekdays, 763-6632.

The Friends group raises funds through membership dues, special events and the sale of Arb Gear to support the mission of the Arboretum.

Business and Finance Diversity Team plans forum

The Business and Finance Organizations Diversity Team will hold its first Diversity Forum 12:30–3:30 p.m. Wed. (April 13) in the Kuenzel Room, Michigan Union. The forum is intended for members of diversity committees throughout the Business and Finance organization, to open lines of communication between members of the various committees. They will discuss current and planned diversity programs.

For information, call Susan Sherry, 936-3078.

Neal will discuss research issues

Homer A. Neal, vice president for research and professor of physics, will discuss “Research Issues at the U-M” 7:30–9:30 p.m. April 21 in East Conference Room, Rackham Bldg. Neal’s lecture is sponsored by the U-M Research Club.

Yost’s ‘Spring Thaw Out Skate’ slated for Thursday

Yost Arena’s “Spring Thaw Out Skate,” the last Thursday night skate of the season, will be held 8–9:50 p.m. April 14. Admission is $3 for adults, $2.75 for faculty, and $2.50 for students and youth. The ice will be removed from Yost Sun. (April 17). Dry floor events begin April 26 with drop-in roller hockey.

Swiss psychologist will discuss resisting evil

Francois Rochat, a psychologist from Lausanne, Switzerland, will discuss “Evil Politics and Resisting Evil: Rescuers During the Holocaust” 7:30–9:30 p.m. today (April 11) in the Natural Science Auditorium.

The lecture is part of the Program on Studies in Religion’s Visiting Professor of Religious Thought Lecture Series. The series will conclude with a lecture by English Prof. Ralph G. Williams April 18 at the same time and location on “Making the Difference: The Evil of Evil.”

Child Development Center will host open house Wednesday

The U-M-Dearborn Child Development Center will offer an open house for prospective kindergarten students 5–6:30 p.m. Wed. (April 13) at the kindergarten classroom, Modular Bldg. 29, near the Student Services Center.

Fall enrollment is open to all children who will be 5 years old before Dec. 1. Both full-time (8 a.m.–3:30 p.m.) and half-time (8 a.m.–noon) enrollment schedules are offered with full-time given priority. Extended care hours are available 7:30–8 a.m. and 3:30–5:30 p.m. For information, call 593-5424.

Child Development Center will host open house Wednesday

The U-M-Dearborn Child Development Center will offer an open house for prospective kindergarten students 5–6:30 p.m. Wed. (April 13) at the kindergarten classroom, Modular Bldg. 29, near the Student Services Center.

Fall enrollment is open to all children who will be 5 years old before Dec. 1. Both full-time (8 a.m.–3:30 p.m.) and half-time (8 a.m.–noon) enrollment schedules are offered with full-time given priority. Extended care hours are available 7:30–8 a.m. and 3:30–5:30 p.m. For information, call 593-5424.

U-M-Flint sponsors seminar about Parkinson’s disease

A regional seminar on the benefits of exercise and models of exercise programs for Parkinson’s disease patients, will be held 10 a.m.–2:30 p.m. Saturday (April 16) at the Genesys Regional Medical Center-St. Joseph Campus.

Sponsored by the U-M-Flint, Genesys Health Systems and the Michigan Parkinson Foundation, the program will examine different models for implementing exercise programs tailored to the unique needs of Parkinson’s disease

patients.

Admission is free and lunch will be provided. Physical and occupational therapists as well as those who have Parkinson’s disease are encouraged to register by today (April 11). For information or to register, call (810) 762-7500.

de Pietro will discuss Family and Medical Leave Act

Leslie A. de Pietro, coordinator of the Family Care Resources Program, will discuss the Family and Medical Leave Act at the Commission for Women meeting noon–1 p.m. Wed. (April 13) in the Michigan Room, Michigan League.

She will discuss the political forces and demographic trends that propelled the passage of the bill as well as how it affects employees and departments at the U-M.

Participants may bring a lunch or purchase one in the League cafeterias.

Golden Key National Honor Society will induct new members

The U-M Chapter of the Golden Key National Honor Society will hold a reception for 300 new members at 7 p.m. today (April 11) in the Michigan League Ballroom.

The society is a non-profit academic honors organization. Membership is by invitation only to the top 15 percent of junior and senior students in all fields of study.

Celebrate women’s athletics

“A Celebration of U-M Women’s Athletics” begins at 6:30 p.m. Fri. (April 15) with a cash bar at the Michigan League Ballroom. The banquet and program begin at 7:30 p.m.

Local radio personality Lucy Ann Lance will emcee the program, which will include remarks by Dorothy Beise Miller, who taught kinesiology courses in the Physical Education Department in 1930–46; Eleanor Doersam, an officer of the Women’s Athletic Association during the heyday of club sports at U-M; Roberta Gubbins, U-M’s most outstanding riflery participant; Joyce Lindeman, coach of the synchronized swimming team in 1967–84; Peggy Bradley-Doppes, associate director of athletics for women; and Marie Hartwig, the first associate director of athletics for women.

Tickets, $50, are on sale at the Ronald McDonald House of Ann Arbor. All proceeds will benefit the Ronald McDonald House.

For information or to order tickets, call 994-4442.

Carillon recital to ring out the term Sunday afternoon

University Carillonneur Margo Halsted will perform the School of Music’s last faculty recital of the winter term at 3:15 p.m. Sun. (April 17) on the bells of Burton Tower. She will perform solo works by Purcell, Joplin and Johnson and will be joined by sophomore music major Brandon Blazo for duets by Shostakovich and Barnes.

Audience members are welcome to listen from the ground or to come to the top of Burton Tower for a more immediate sonic experience and panoramic view of Ann Arbor. Admission is free.