The University Record, September 3, 1996

World Wide Web wildlife

Biology Prof. Philip Myers listens to a wolf howl, part of the Canis lupus entry on the U-M's Animal Diversity Database. Note: Because of copyright restricitions, some photographs cannot be viewed outside the U-M system.

Photo Credit: Sandy J. Beadle


Howling wolves, croaking frogs and color images of more than 1,000 animals from sponges to skunks can be found on the Animal Diversity Web---a multimedia database on the World Wide Web created and maintained at the University. Originally developed by biology Prof. Philip Myers as a text for his first-year course, "An Introduction to Animal Diversity," the Animal Diversity Web is now used by students all over the world.

Students can access complete, up-to-date information on just one animal, browse at random through more than 1,000 species organized by class and phylum, or search the database for animals with specific food habits or a geographic range. In the process, students see how zoologists organize and categorize different species---as well as learn basic concepts of natural history, ecology, evolution, biodiversity and conservation. Each entry includes a reference section with suggestions for students who need more detailed information.

Text entries in the Animal Diversity Web are written by U-M faculty, graduate students and hundreds of undergraduates enrolled in Myers' animal diversity course and other classes. Undergraduate students share what they learn in the classroom by researching, writing and receiving author credit for two new entries on the continually expanding Animal Diversity Web.

Explore the Animal Diversity Web at http://www.oit.itd.umich.edu/projects/ADW/.

Howling wolves, croaking frogs and color images of more than 1,000 animals from sponges to skunks can be found on the Animal Diversity Web---a multimedia database on the World Wide Web created and maintained at the University. Originally developed by biology Prof. Philip Myers as a text for his first-year course, "An Introduction to Animal Diversity," the Animal Diversity Web is now used by students all over the world.

Students can access complete, up-to-date information on just one animal, browse at random through more than 1,000 species organized by class and phylum, or search the database for animals with specific food habits or a geographic range. In the process, students see how zoologists organize and categorize different species---as well as learn basic concepts of natural history, ecology, evolution, biodiversity and conservation. Each entry includes a reference section with suggestions for students who need more detailed information.

Text entries in the Animal Diversity Web are written by U-M faculty, graduate students and hundreds of undergraduates enrolled in Myers' animal diversity course and other classes. Undergraduate students share what they learn in the classroom by researching, writing and receiving author credit for two new entries on the continually expanding Animal Diversity Web.

Explore the Animal Diversity Web at http://www.oit.itd.umich.edu/projects/ADW/.