The University Record, January 11, 1999

MLK Commemoration 1999

The 12th Annual Martin Luther King Jr. Symposium

Editor’s Note: Please check the Web at www.umich.edu/~oami/mlk99/ for the most up to date information on times and locatons.


Publication

Identities. A Publication on Race and Diversity will be available beginning Jan. 18 at the Office of Academic Multicultural Initiatives, Center for Afroamerican and African Studies, Women’s Studies Program and Hillel, 827-1651.

The free publication focuses on race relations, diversity and multiculturalism at the University featuring the writings of students and faculty members.

Exhibitions

Through Jan. 29, Shades of Us, 7 a.m.–midnight, Pierpont Commons, 332-1331.

Sponsor: Organization of African-American Artists, Architects, and Planners.

Exhibition features the works of minority art and architecture students, faculty and professionals.

Jan. 23–Feb. 13: Acariciando el Lienzo: El arte Latino (Caressing the Canvas: Latino Art), 9 a.m.–9 p.m., Trotter House, 647-3873.

Sponsors: LSPA and La Voz Mexicana.

Art exhibit displaying Latino/a artists working in different mediums. A reception will be held Jan. 23.

Opening Jan. 22: Thirst for Waters: Cultural Identities of the People and Artists of Carriacon, Room 209, West Hall, 332-0329. Opening reception 4–7 p.m. Jan. 22.

Sponsors: Center for Afroamerican & African Studies, Michigan Association of Black Graduate Students and Caribbean Peoples Association.

An art exhibition highlighting artists’ personal experiences with and the major cultural events and persons of the Caribbean island society of Carriacon, Grenada. Guests can expect to be introduced to then enlightened by the strong sense of identity and history Carriaconans have within their being.

Repeating Performances

The Blackness Blues—Time To Change The Tune (A Sister’s Story), 7 p.m. Jan. 14 & 18, 8 p.m. Jan. 15, Arena Theatre, Frieze Bldg., 434-5931.

Sponsor: Theatre Department/Basement Arts

A play written in the style of a choreopoem, expressing the unique culture of Black people in America that takes an innovative approach to urging people to discover their self worth and the meaning behind their identity.

Concert: The Gospel at Colonus, 8 p.m. Jan. 15, 16, 18; 2 p.m. Jan. 16; 3 p.m. Jan. 17, Power Center, 764-2538. Tickets are $34, $28 and $16.

Sponsors: University Musical Society, Office of the Provost, the Lila Wallace-Reader’s Digest Audiences for the Performing Arts Network, NBD Bank and WEMU, 89.1 FM.

Features J.D. Steele and special guest, Jevetta Steel, Clarence Fountain and the Blind Boys of Alabama, the Original Soul Stirrers, Rev. Earl Miller, the Duke Ellington Centennial Chorus.

 

Exhibit Museum Planetarium Shows

*The People and Their Sky: African Sky Tales, 12:30 & 3:30 p.m. Saturdays, Jan. 16, 23, 30; 3 p.m. Sundays, Jan. 17, 24, 31; 1 & 3 p.m. Jan. 18, Exhibit Museum. Tickets $3.25 adults, $3 senior citizens, children age 12 and under. 764-0478.

Sponsors: Exhibit Museum of Natural History, Office of the Vice Provost for Academic and Multicultural Affairs.

The People and Their Sky: African Sky Tales tells about the hopes, fears and speculations of the African people. Narrated by storytellers from the Detroit Storytellers Association and illustrated by students from the School of Art and Design.

Wednesday, January 13

Reception welcoming Rev. Dr. Elias Ferajaje-Jones, 3 p.m., Michigan Union, 936-1055.

Sponsors: All Us: A Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Collective at the U-M and Office of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Affairs.

A welcoming public potluck for Rev. Dr. Elias Ferajaje-Jones. Please bring a dish to pass.

Lecture: A World of True Unity & Diversity, Elias Ferajaje-Jones, 6 p.m., Room 1800, Chemistry Bldg., 936-1055.

Sponsors: All Us and LGBT Affairs.

Ferajaje-Jones, professor of history and of sociology of religion at Starr King, will discuss building a world of true unity and diversity. Ferajaje-Jones’ scholarly works include In Search of Zion and African Creative Expressions of the Divine.

Community Gospel Sing-Along, The Gospel at Colonus cast, 7 p.m., Martin Luther King High School Auditorium, 3200 East Lafayette, Detroit, 647-6712.

Sponsors: University Musical Society; Office of the Associate Provost for Academic Affairs; NBD Bank; Ford; WEMU, 89.1 FM.; the Charles H. Wright Museum of African-American History; and Wayne County RESA.

Sing along with The Gospel at Colonus cast and Clarence Fountain and the Blind Boys of Alabama, the Original Soul Stirrers, J.D. and Teretta Steele, Rev. Earl Miller and the Detroit-based Duke Ellington Centennial Choir.

Thursday, January 14

Panel: Implementing the Dream in Sciences and Engineering, 4–6 p.m., 1109 FXB Building, Boeing Lecture Hall, 936-3066.

Sponsors: American Society for Engineering Education Student Chapter

Stephen Director, the Robert J. Vlasic Dean, College of Engineering, will give an opening address, followed by a lecture by Earl Lewis, dean, Horace H. Rackham School of Graduate Studies. Then a dialogue examining issues hindering minority involvement in the sciences and engineering will begin. Panelists include Lewis; Lewis Kleinsmith, professor of biology; Avery Demond, associate professor of civil and environmental engineering; Maricel Kann, graduate student in chemistry; and Damaune Journey, undergraduate student, industrial and operations engineering. The moderator will be Cinda-Sue Davis, director, Women in Science and Engineering Program.

Lecture: Then & Now: A Reflection on Social Justice in the 1960s and 1990s, Julian Bond, 5:30 p.m., Mendelssohn Theatre, 936-1055.

Sponsors: MLK Symposium Planning Committee, Center for Afroamerican and African Studies, Career Planning and Placement, Departments of History and Political Science, and School of Public Policy.

Julian Bond, chairman, National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), has been an active participant in the movement for civil rights, economic justice and peace for more than three decades. Bond will provide a historic and contemporary reflection on the struggle for social justice.

Lecture: Building Communities from the Inside Out: Mobilizing Community Assets in a Diverse Society, John McKnight, 7–9 p.m., Pendleton Room, Michigan Union, 647-7402.

Sponsor: Center for Community Service and Learning.

McKnight, director of Community Studies, Northwestern University, pioneered the idea of assets-based community development, enabling communities to build on their own assets for social action.

Friday, January 15

Lecture: Modeling the Temporal Basis of Social Differentiation in Caribbean Spanish, Henrietta Cedergren, 4 p.m., Hussey Room, Michigan League, caldrich@umich.edu.

Sponsors: Program in Linguistics, Department of Romance Languages and Literature.

Cedergren, University of Quebec, Montreal, will discuss the hypothesis that one of the parameters responsible for regulating sociolinguistic variation is speech tempo.

Panel: Perspectives on Social Justice, Discussion with Evelyn Hu-Dehart and Roberto Rodriguez, 4 p.m., Mendelssohn Theatre, Michigan League, 936-1055.

Sponsors: 1999 MLK Symposium Planning Committee and Movimiento Estudiantil Chicano de Atzlan.

Hu-Dehart, professor of history and chair, Department of Ethnic Studies, University of Colorado, and Rodriguez, senior writer, Black Issues in Higher Education, will address multi-ethnic social justice topics.

Presentation: Change: What Are We Afraid Of, 7–9 p.m., Anderson Room, Michigan Union, 936-3709.

Sponsor: Zeta Phi Beta Sorority Inc.

King’s book, Three Little Words, will be used to look at how underrepresented minorities can achieve success, especially in nontraditional jobs.

Performance: A Tribute through the Arts to Dr. King, 9–11 p.m., Leonardo’s, Pierpont Commons, 647-6838.

Sponsors: Black Arts Council and Pierpont Commons Arts and Programs.

An evening of song, dance, music and poetry and interpretation as members and friends of the Black Arts Council and the University community gather to pay tribute to the spirit of King.

Saturday, January 16

Workshops: Learning from the Community, 9 a.m.–5 p.m., Angell and Mason Halls, 647-7402 or harft@umich.edu. Pre-registration is required.

Sponsors: Center for Community Service and Learning; schools of Public Health, Information, Business Administration and Social Work; Medical and Law schools; College of Architecture and Urban Planning; Michigan Neighborhood AmeriCorps Program; Undergraduate Research Opportunity Program; and LS&A.

Workshop sessions feature practical ways for working with community-based organizations and civic agencies in a culturally diverse society.

Intergenerational Role-Play and Storytelling: Detroit Storyliving’s Right of the People, 1–3 p.m., 4–5:30 p.m., Underground Railroad, 4–5:30 p.m., both in Koessler Room, Michigan League. Each story limited to 40 participants. Repeats Jan. 18. 936-1055.

Sponsors: The 1999 MLK Symposium Planning Committee, schools of Education and Social Work.

“Right of the People” explores the Nashville student lunch counter sit-ins of 1960.

“Underground Railroad” provides a perspective on Michigan’s Underground Railroad.

Lecture: Mascots and Motifs: Negotiating the Images of Native Americans and Popular Culture, Charlene Teeters, 6 p.m., Mendelssohn Theatre, 936-1055.

Sponsors: 1999 MLK Symposium Planning Committee, Native American Student Association.

Teeters, an expert on Native American culture, will examine the history and misuse of Native American imagery by the media and sports franchises.

Performance: Jam 4 Jesus, 6:30 p.m., Rackham Auditorium, 994-4767.

Sponsor: Musicians for Christ

Gospel music featuring Vertical Praise and the United Michigan Mass Choir.

Performance: A Musical Celebration of the MLK Holiday, Charlie King and the Sacred Song Singers, 7:30 p.m., St. Clare’s Episcopal Church, 2309 Packard, 663-1870 (days) or 663-7933 (evenings). Tickets, $10 in advance, $12 at door (children age 12 and under $5 and $7).

Sponsors: Interfaith Council for Peace and Justice and Nonviolent Action for Racial Justice.

Pete Seeger has called singer Charlie King “one of the most brilliant and agile singers.” King’s tribute also will include a performance by the Sacred Song Singers, a multicultural group celebrating diversity through song and tradition.

*Performance: Encompass Show, 8 p.m., Michigan Theater, 332-7842 or www.umich.edu/~encomp. Tickets, $5.50 and $7.50, are available at the Michigan Union Ticket Office.

Sponsors: Michigan Student Assembly, Rackham Student Government, Office of Academic Multicultural Initiatives, LS&A Student Government, Business School, Dialogues on Diversity and Dean of Students Office.

U of M’s first pan-ethnic cultural show showcasing the campus’s diversity through music, dance, theater and other artistic exhibitions. Performances by 58 Greene, Persian Student Association, Kol Hakavod, Sinaboro: Korean Drum Performance Troupe and others.

Sunday, January 17

Arabesque Poetry Jam and Cultural Gathering, 7 p.m., University Club, Michigan Union, 936-1055.

Sponsor: Arab-American Anti-Discrimination Committee.

A program featuring Arab and Arab-American music, poetry, dancing and food.

Monday, January 18

Performance: Hikone Kuumba Troupe, 9–9:30 a.m., Shorling Auditorium, School of Education Bldg., 764-7563

Sponsors: Schools of Education and Social Work, and 1999 MLK Symposium Planning Committee.

A children’s group from Community Action Center will perform an Afrocentric dance.

Film: Our Friend, Martin, 9:40–10:40 a.m., Shorling Auditorium, School of Education Bldg., 764-7563.

Sponsors: Schools of Education and Social Work and Office of Academic Multicultural Initiatives.

Our Friend, Martin is an animated film about two boys from modern times who travel back in time and meet Martin Luther King Jr. at various points in his life.

Performance: The Mosaic Theater Group, 10:40 a.m.–noon, Shorling Auditorium, School of Education Bldg., 764-7563.

Sponsors: Schools of Education and Social Work and MLK Symposium Planning Committee.

A Detroit-based theater and choir group will perform traditional and contemporary songs.

Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., Memorial Lecture: On the Verge of a New Millenium . . . STAND, Nikki Giovanni, 10 a.m., Hill Auditorium, 936-1055.

Sponsor: MLK Symposium Planning Committee.

For the past 25 years, Nikki Giovanni’s outspokenness in her more than 20 books has made her one of the most widely ready American poets.

MLK Day March, 11:30 a.m. (after keynote). 763-3241.

Sponsors: United for Equality and Affirmative Action, and the MSA Peace and Justice Commission.

Marchers will gather at 11:30 a.m. at S. University and Forest Avenues, uniting high school and college students in the fight for equality in education.

Performance: Suzuki Youth Violinists for Peace and Justice, noon (after keynote), Hill Auditorium , 998-8504.

Sponsors: Parents of students, faculty members and alumni.

Approximately 15 violinists, ages 5–17, will be performing to raise donations for the Southern Poverty Law Center.

Panel: Recruitment/Retention of Faculty, Students and Staff from Underrepresented Groups to Mechanical Engineering and Applied Mechanics, noon–2:30 p.m., Room 2211, G.G. Brown, 936-0408.

Sponsor: Department of Mechanical Engineering and Applied Mechanics (MEAM).

James Barber, professor of mechanical engineering and applied mechanics; Dogulas Kennedy, administrative manager, MEAM; and Derrick Scott, director, Minority Engineering Programming Office, will discuss challenges and issues surrounding underrepresented groups in engineering careers.

Presentation: Health Sciences MLK Keynote Address, Noreen Clark, dean, School of Public Health, and the Marshall H. Becker Collegiate Professor of Public Health, noon, Dow Auditorium, Towsley Center, 647-1911.

Sponsors: Schools of Dentistry, Nursing, Public Health and Social Work; Medical School; College of Pharmacy; and U-M Hospitals and Health Centers.

Community Service Project: Acting on the Dream, 1–6 p.m., meet at Room 1600, Chemistry Bldg, 936-2437 or cplt.info@umich.edu.

Sponsors: Project SERVE and 1999 MLK Symposium Planning Committee.

After a brief introductory session, participants will be taken to various community-based agencies in the Ann Arbor and Ypsilanti area.

Performance: Stand: Lift Every Voice and Sing, 1–3 p.m., Rackham Amphitheater, 763-1317.

Sponsors: Women of Color Task Force and Office of Equity & Diversity Services

Variations, a choral and dramatic ensemble, will perform a collection of Negro spirituals.

Intergenerational Role-Play and Storytelling: Detroit Storyliving’s Right of the People, 1–3 p.m., 4–5:30 p.m., Underground Railroad, 4–5:30 p.m., both in Koessler Room, Michigan League. Each story limited to 40 participants. 936-1055.

Sponsors: The 1999 MLK Symposium Planning Committee, schools of Education and Social Work.

“Right of the People” explores the Nashville student lunch counter sit-ins of 1960.

“Underground Railroad” provides a perspective on Michigan’s Underground Railroad.

Film and Discussion: At the River I Stand, 1:30 p.m., Room 4, Michigan League, 764-5191.

Sponsor: Office of Equity & Diversity Services.

At the River I Stand is a documentary that chronicles King’s participating in the Memphis sanitation workers’ strike and the events that led to his assassination.

Lecture: On the Verge of a New Millenium: What Is Dr. King’s Dream? Johnetta B. Cole, 1:30 p.m., Hale Auditorium, 936-3515.

Sponsor: Business School.

Cole, president emerita, Spelman College, will examine the contemporary meanings of King’s life and mission. A question-and-answer session follows her lecture.

Film and Dialogue: Shattering the Sciences, 1:30–3:30 p.m., Room 3735, Central Campus Recreation Building, 647-2698.

Sponsors: Division of Kinesiology and the Paul Robeson Center.

Issues and challenges facing faculty who are women or persons of color are explored in the video. Dialogue will follow.

Lecture: Strengthening Fragile Families, Ronald B. Mincy, senior program officer for employment and welfare, Ford Foundation, 1:30–3:30 p.m., Room 140, Lorch Hall, 764-7508.

Sponsors: School of Public Policy; Law School; and Program on Poverty, the Underclass and Public Policy.

Performance: Camp Logan, 2–4 p.m., Michigan Union Ballroom, 764-9361.

Sponsors: Information Technology Division and the School of Information.

A theatrical drama based on the 1917 courts-martial of the Black soldiers of the U.S. Army’s 24th Infantry.

Lecture: Native American Mathematics, Robert Megginson, 2 p.m., Room 1360, East Hall, 997-0418.

Sponsor: Department of Mathematics.

Megginson will present a one hour lecture on Native American mathematics. The talk will be understandable to those with a high-school level in mathematics.

Dialogue: On the Verge of a New Millenium . . . Stand! Hazel Whitney, 2–3:30 p.m., Kellogg Auditorium, Dental School, 763-3337.

Sponsor: School of Dentistry Multicultural Affairs Committee.

Whitney, poet, educator, civil rights activist and Christian leader, will lead the dialogue.

Dialogue: Ambivalent Visions: Portrayals of Emancipation in the 19th-Century Sculpture, Margaret Cool Root, 2:30 p.m., Museum of Art, mcroot@umich.edu.

Sponsor: Department of History of Art.

Root, professor and chair, Department of History of Art will focus on Randolph Rogers’ study for “Emancipation of a Female Slave” (c. 1866). A reading from Kirk Savage’s Standing Soldiers Kneeling Slaves will be available in the History of Art Office, Tappan Hall.

Panel: Urban Education: Issues and Implications, 2:30 p.m., Whitney Auditorium, School of Education Bldg., 936-1055.

Sponsors: 1999 MLK Symposium Planning Committee and School of Education.

Panel includes Gloria Landson-Billings, professor of education, University of Wisconsin; Kris Gutierrez, professor of education, UCLA; Harvey Dorrah, professor, Central Michigan University; and Ray Johnson, principal, Paul Robeson Academy, Detroit. The moderator will be Arnetha Ball, professor of education.

Performance and Lecture: African American Chorale Music Since the Civil Rights Movement, Brazeal Dennard, 3 p.m., Rackham Auditorium, 764-0586.

Sponsors: Black Arts Council, School of Music and Prof. Willis Patterson.

Dennard’s lecture will be followed by a performance by the Brazeal Dennard Chorale of Detroit.

Panel: Civic Engagement in a Diverse Democratic Society: Getting Students to Stand, 3–4:30 p.m., Kalamazoo Room, Michigan League, 647-7402.

Sponsors: Center for Community Service and Learning, Michigan Leadership Initiatives, W.K. Kellogg Foundation.

Barry Checkoway, professor of social work, will moderate a panel addressing what we mean when we talk about student civic engagement, and what the University’s responsibility is regarding the preparation of students for civic participation, leadership and democratic citizenship.

Dialogue: Take A Stand: An Open Debate on Affirmative Action, 3 p.m., Angell Hall, 761-7735.

Sponsor: Academics for Affirmative Action and Social Justice.

A public dialogue for those who support, those who oppose and those who are in the middle regarding affirmative action. An open mic will be available.

Presentation: Athletes and the Dream: A Student Tribute, 3-4:30 p.m., Cliff Keen Arena, 647-1258.

Sponsors: Athletic Department and student athletes.

Engineering Student Forum: What’s Really Going On? 3:30–5:30 p.m., East Room, Pierpont Commons, 763-3863.

Sponsors: NOBCChE, UMEC, SMES.

A forum on diversity and how it affects College of Engineering students. Interactive skits will be followed by open discussion.

Panel: Diversity in Student Housing Communities: An Open Discussion, 4 p.m., Angell Hall Auditorium, 327-0540.

Sponsor: Multicultural Affairs Committee of the Inter-Cooperative Council.

Open forum on the issue of diversity in student housing communities both on and off campus.

Panel: Our Voices Will Be Heard: Students’ Intervention into the Lawsuit at U of M, 4 p.m., Room 2105B, Michigan Union, 330-5073.

Sponsors: United for Equality and Affirmative Action for Intervening Organization, BAMN and other student intervenors.

Panelists discussing the role of students in defending affirmative action include Miranda K.S. Massie, attorney for proposed intervenors, Law School case; Rev. Milton Henry, attorney for proposed intervenors, undergraduate case; Shanta Driver, organizer, Intervening Organization, BAMN; and other student intervenors.

Lecture: Equal Justice under the Law, Hon. Constance Baker Motley, 4:30 p.m., Room 250, Hutchins Hall, 615-0019.

Sponsors: Law School and Dialogues on Diversity.

Motely, the first African American woman appointed to the bench, will discuss the role she played as principal attorney for the NAACP Legal Defense Fund during the King era. Motely worked on all the major school segregation cases supported by the LDF in 1945–64, including Brown v Board of Education. A book-signing follows her lecture.

Health Sciences MLK Panel Discussion, 5:30–7:30 p.m., Alumni Center, 647-1911.

Sponsors: Schools of Dentistry, Nursing, Public Health and Social Work; Medical School; College of Pharmacy; and the Health System.

Panelists discussing “Who Will Stand in the Gap for Our Families’ Health?” include Eddie Boyd, associate professor of pharmacy; Larry Gant, associate professor of social work; Sylvia Chipio-Mupepi, graduate student in nursing; and Lucila Nerenberg, clinical instructor in psychiatry.

Fireside Chat with President Emeritus James Duderstadt, 7 p.m., MLK Lounge, Bursley Hall, 763-3994.

Sponsors: The Bursley Family.

Duderstadt will speak on the significance of the Michigan Mandate and the BAM III and UCAR movements.

Performance: Images of Identities Presents . . ., 8 p.m., Michigan League Underground, 998-0941.

Sponsor: Michigan League Programming Board.

Images of Identities, an African American acting troupe, will commemorate King’s life and mission.

Tuesday, January 19

Grand Rounds: Physician Leadership in the Civil Rights Movement—Huntsville, Alabama, 1962, Sonnie Hereford, 8–9 a.m., Maternal and Child Health Center Auditorium, 544-3212.

Sponsor: Department of Pediatrics.

Poster Presentation: Students Engaged in Community, 10 a.m.–6 p.m., Michigan League Ballroom, 998-9381.

Sponsor: LS&A.

An opportunity for students to share their community work.

Discussion: The Fight to Defend Affirmative Action-Where Do We Go From Here? 4 p.m., Parker Room, Michigan Union, 330-5073.

Sponsor: Coalition to Defend Affirmative Action by Any Means Necessary (BAMN).

Discussion focuses on the Students and Youth Day of Action to Defend Affirmative Action on Feb. 24; students’ intervention in the lawsuits; and organizing a national march on Washington, D.C., to defend affirmative action.

Panel and Lecture: Students in the Community: A Celebration, Patricia Gurin, 4–5:30 p.m., Vandenberg Room, Michigan League, 998-9381.

Sponsor: LS&A.

Gurin, dean of LS&A, will discuss student involvement in community work, followed by a student panel and an award ceremony.

Performance: Ulali, 7:30 p.m., Mendelssohn Theatre, 936-1055.

Sponsor: 1999 MLK Symposium Planning Committee.

Ulali, an a capella trio of Native American women, combine music from the Apache, Mayan and Tuscaroran tribes, as well as blues and gospel music.

Wednesday, January 20

Workshop: Mixed Media: Multicultural Issues in Film, 5:30–8 p.m., Room 2105A, Michigan Union, 668-1378.

Sponsor: Mixed Initiative.

Short film clips focusing on multicultural issues followed by a dialogue on negative and positive images of multiracial families.

Lecture and Dialogue: Racism: Is Islam the Solution? Saleem Khalid, 7 p.m., Pendleton Room, Michigan Union, 213-3155.

Sponsor: Muslim Students Association.

Khalid, a member of the Muslim community in Detroit, will present an Islamic perspective on racism and the struggle for justice.

Thursday, January 21

Film and Discussion: The Meaning Behind the Dance for Mother Earth/Ann Arbor Pow Wow, 3–5 p.m., Huetwell Visitors Center, Student Activities Bldg., 763-4123.

Sponsor: Office of Financial Aid.

Ann Arbor Pow Wow video with discussion facilitator Shannon M. Martin, Native American student coordinator, Multi-Ethnic Student Affairs.

Lecture: Tokens are for Spending: The Growing Impact of Diversity on Medicine in America, Alexa Canady, 4 p.m., Dow Auditorium, Towsley Center, 936-4280.

Alexa Canady, the first African American woman neurosurgeon, will speak on the impact of diversity on medicine. A panel discussion by minority medical students and faculty precedes a reception and information fair.

Lecture: Ultrafast Optics, Anthony Johnson, professor of physics, 4:10 p.m., Room 340, West Hall, 936-0657.

Sponsors: Department of Physics and CUOS Visiting Fellows Program.

Friday, January 22

Third Annual 1999 Midwestern Indian American Students Conference—Mission: Limitless, noon, Pendleton Room, Michigan Union, 764-7767.

Sponsor: Indian American Student Association.

“Mission: Limitless” aims to unite the Midwestern Indian American student community by exploring the different paths of activism. Speakers include Minnesota Rep. Satveer Chaudhary; Anju Bhargava, community activist; and Priya Haji, founder of the Free At Last Drug Rehabilitation Center. Conference runs through 4 p.m. Jan. 24.

Transportation and Society Seminar: Moving Chicago: A Transportation Plan for the 21st-Century, Thomas Walker, commissioner, noon–2 p.m., Pendleton Room, Michigan Union, 763-0039.

Sponsors: Great Lakes Center for Truck and Transit Research, Transportation Research Institute, and Urban and Regional Planning Program.

Panel: Success Strategies for Minorities in the 21st-Century Business World, 2–4 p.m., Room D1276, Business School, 763-0648.

Sponsor: Ernst & Young LLP.

Successful minority senior executives and entrepreneurs examine what it will take for minority students to have a successful career in the 21st-century business world.

Lecture: Reflections, Otis Henderson, 4–5 p.m., Oliphant-Marshall Auditorium, 647-3199.

Sponsor: Department of Ophthalmology Visions of Diversity Team.

Henderson presents a poignant, personal account of activities when he attended Morehouse College with King.

Exhibition Reception: Thirst for Waters: Cultural Identities of the People and Artists of Carriacon, 4–7 p.m., CAAS Gallery and Room 209, West Hall, 332-0329.

Sponsors: Center for Afroamerican and African Studies, Michigan Association of Black Graduate Students and Caribbean Peoples Association.

An art exhibition highlighting artists’ personal experiences with and the major cultural events and persons of the Caribbean island society of Carriacon, Grenada.

Saturday, January 23

Third Annual 1999 Midwestern Indian American Students Conference, Pendleton Room, Michigan Union, 764-7767. See Jan. 22.

Panel: STAND . . . Latino/a Leadership Past, Present, Future, 3–5 p.m., Cesar Chavez Lounge, Mosher-Jordan, 332-6056.

Sponsor: Alianza Latino/a Student Alliance.

Panelists discussing Latino/a leadership past, present and future will include Mario Manuel Vasquez, faculty and student leaders.

Sunday, January 24

Third Annual 1999 Midwestern Indian American Students Conference, Pendleton Room, Michigan Union, 764-7767. See Jan. 22.

Monday, January 25

Panel: Trying the Systems: Lawyers and Racial Justice, 4 p.m., Room 250, Hutchins Hall, Law School, 913-4912.

Sponsor: Michigan Journal of Race and Law.

As part of the Michigan Journal of Race and Law’s 1999 speaker’s series, “The Myth of Human Rights? Racial Equality in Domestic and International Law,” the Journal panel discussion focuses on the historical role the law played in supporting and advancing the civil rights movement. Speakers include J.L. Chestnut Jr., attorney at law and civil rights activist; Julie Su, staff attorney, Asian Pacific American Legal Center; and Mansa J. Demeo, regional counsel, Mexican American Legal Defense and Education Fund.

Lecture: Moving Beyond the Rhetoric: Affirmative Action and Education, Ted Shaw, 6 p.m., Rackham Amphitheater, 936-1055.

Sponsors: 1999 MLK Symposium Planning Committee, Black Law Students Association and the Michigan Journal of Race and Law.

Shaw, associate director and counsel, National Association for the Advancement of Colored People Legal Defense Fund, will speak on “Affirmative Action and Higher Education,” followed by a panel discussion with undergraduate and graduate students.

Saturday, January 30

Concert: We Shall Overcome, Mosaic Singers, 1 p.m., Residential College Auditorium, 647-4354.

Sponsors: Residential College Drama Concentration, East Quadrangle and Residential College Diversity Committee.

This award-winning youth theater, which represented the United States last year in the International Youth Theatre Festival, will present its acclaimed choral ensemble in a concert of songs from diverse cultures.


You can always drop us a line: urecord@umich.edu.