The University Record, October 11, 1999

Medical School convocation begins celebration of 150th year

Since 1850, the Medical School has graduated physicians and surgeons who have ‘helped solve all the great medical mysteries of their era,’ said Dean Allen S. Lichter during the School’s 150th anniversary convocation Oct. 1. Antonnia Novello, former U.S. surgeon general, and neurosurgeon Keith Black joined seven other speakers, all of whom spoke with pride and gratitude of fond memories from their years of working, learning and teaching at the Medical School and U-M Hospitals. Since the School opened Oct. 3, 1850, when medical school tuition was $5, more than 18,000 physicians have graduated from its highly respected program. Click here for story. Photo by Paul Jaronski


Photos

2 pianos entertain in Hospital lobby

Gary Meyer (standing), David Wu, Nancy Han and Michele Gray recently performed music for two pianos on two baby grand pianos in the University Hospital lobby. The pianos were brought in especially for the occasion by the Gifts of Art program to entertain both visitors and patients. The performers are members of the Borodin Society, a group of medical students who have an interest—and talent—in music. Photo by Bob Kalmbach

Motor Meals marks 25th anniversary

Motor Meals, the meal delivery service for Ann Arbor-area older adults, marked its 25th anniversary this past weekend.

Run by the Health System since 1994, Motor Meals serves two meals six days a week to more than 200 local residents, with an optional bag lunch for the seventh day.

More than 250 volunteers keep the program running, and they recently expanded into rural areas around Ann Arbor.

Ann Arbor Mayor Ingrid Sheldon declared Oct. 9 as ‘Motor Meals Day.’

Simon Eaglin (left) and Henry VanderKaay loaded up coolers and baskets last week, prior to making their deliveries. Photo by Bob Kalmbach

El Camino fans, rejoice

‘El Caminoville,’ an exhibition of more than 450 El Camino sightings, will be on display at the Jean Paul Slusser Gallery Oct. 29–Nov. 30.

The exhibition incorporates photographs, sculpture, video and a 20-foot scroll illustrating artist Mike Rogers’ theory of the vehicle’s evolution and designs for a 1999 model, should the El Camino make a comeback.

Rogers, who says the project mixes fantasy and fact, was a reporter and associate editor with both Fortune magazine and the Los Angeles Herald Examiner before receiving a master of fine arts degree in 1966 from the Otis College of Art and Design.

Located in the Art and Architecture Building, the Slusser is open 11 a.m.–4 p.m. daily. Photo by Mike Rogers

‘Gesture’ is focus of exhibition

‘A Form, A Flower, A Flame’ by Augusto Arbizo is among the works in the exhibition ‘Gesture and Contemporary Painting,’ on display at the Warren Robbins Gallery at the School of Art and Design Oct. 29–Nov. 30. The opening reception will be held 7–9 p.m. Oct. 29.

The exhibition, curated by Brian Stechschulte and Mike Underwood, examines the implications of the use of gesture as a point of departure in recent painting, and investigates the postmodern dilemma that a use of gesture suggests.

Artists featured in the exhibition, in addition to Arbizo, are David Reed, Suzanne McClelland, Giles Lyon, Jesse Lambert, James Nares, Andrea Belag, Eva Lundsager, Richmond Burton, Lydia Dona, Fabian Marcaccio, Rochelle Feinstein and Elizabeth Cooper.

While gesture figures conspicuously in each artist’s work, it operates alternately as a reference, representation, appropriated form, concrete form, commentary, and/or handwriting. Photo courtesy School of Art and Design

A Little Night Music opens Oct. 14

A romantic triangle (clockwise, from top) of Alexander C. Gemignani, who plays Fredrik Egerman; Maclain Looper, who plays Count Carl-Magnus Malcolm; and Patricia Lavery as Desiree Armfeldt is part of the fun in Stephen Sondheim’s ‘A Little Night Music.’

The musical event is produced by the Musical Theatre Department. Performances are at 8 p.m. Oct. 14–16 and 2 p.m. on Oct. 17. Tickets, $18 and $14, are available by calling 764-0450. Photo by David Smith Photography