Office of the Vice President for Global Communications

Thursday, March 5, 2009

President Mary Sue Coleman addresses how U-M makes a difference in the state’s economy through a commitment to Ann Arbor, physical growth and a continually growing research portfolio, during a talk with the Ann Arbor Rotary Club. Coleman highlighted the recent on-campus filming of a Hollywood movie, ongoing construction at North Quad and the C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital, and expansion of Michigan Stadium, in addition to added research facilities such as the former Pfizer property. (Courtesy Michigan Productions)

RU Connected?
Get connected with the latest campus news by reading the Record Update, a Web page updated daily that provides a brief, vibrant summary of what is happening across campus, as well as thoughtful perspectives on issues affecting U-M and higher education. We’re sending the Record Update today to encourage you to sign up for delivery right to your inbox. As an incentive, you will be eligible for great prizes, including a smart phone that will help keep you connected.

HealthSense offers tips for managing rising health care costs
Raising awareness about health care costs and offering solutions for how to minimize them is the focus of a robust new HealthSense Web site. It offers information on how members of the campus community and others can help impact costs, often with relatively simple steps.

Class examines videogames as learning tool
For students, the first-ever listing of a Videogames and Learning class surely sounded like fun. While fun is part of the class experience, there are deeper lessons to take from the class, in which students explore how game designers teach rules and concepts that players must grasp to play well.

The Michigan Difference

Disabled and whole
Similar to the way scholars study race and minority groups, scholars like Tobin Siebers of LSA are looking at what it means to be disabled, for both the individual and society. These scholars are not looking to cure disability, but are finding that they can use lessons from their disciplines to both better understand disability and enhance their own fields of study.

Record Update: Thursday, March 5, 2009 | University of MIchigan

Office of the Vice President for Global Communications

Thursday, March 5, 2009

President Mary Sue Coleman addresses how U-M makes a difference in the state’s economy through a commitment to Ann Arbor, physical growth and a continually growing research portfolio, during a talk with the Ann Arbor Rotary Club. Coleman highlighted the recent on-campus filming of a Hollywood movie, ongoing construction at North Quad and the C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital, and expansion of Michigan Stadium, in addition to added research facilities such as the former Pfizer property. (Courtesy Michigan Productions)

RU Connected?
Get connected with the latest campus news by reading the Record Update, a Web page updated daily that provides a brief, vibrant summary of what is happening across campus, as well as thoughtful perspectives on issues affecting U-M and higher education. We’re sending the Record Update today to encourage you to sign up for delivery right to your inbox. As an incentive, you will be eligible for great prizes, including a smart phone that will help keep you connected.

HealthSense offers tips for managing rising health care costs
Raising awareness about health care costs and offering solutions for how to minimize them is the focus of a robust new HealthSense Web site. It offers information on how members of the campus community and others can help impact costs, often with relatively simple steps.

Class examines videogames as learning tool
For students, the first-ever listing of a Videogames and Learning class surely sounded like fun. While fun is part of the class experience, there are deeper lessons to take from the class, in which students explore how game designers teach rules and concepts that players must grasp to play well.

The Michigan Difference

Disabled and whole
Similar to the way scholars study race and minority groups, scholars like Tobin Siebers of LSA are looking at what it means to be disabled, for both the individual and society. These scholars are not looking to cure disability, but are finding that they can use lessons from their disciplines to both better understand disability and enhance their own fields of study.