Office of the Vice President for Global Communications

Wednesday, April 20, 2011

Two U-M faculty members named to American Academy of Arts and Sciences

U-M professors Sharon Glotzer and Scott Page have been named to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, a prestigious society that recognizes individuals who have made significant contributions in scholarly and professional fields.

 
  Sharon Glotzer
   
 
  Scott Page

They are among 212 new fellows and 16 foreign honorary members, including scholars, scientists, writers, artists, and civic, corporate and philanthropic leaders.

Glotzer, the Stuart W. Churchill Collegiate Professor of Chemical Engineering, conducts research in the areas of computational nanoscience and simulation of soft matter, self-assembly and materials design. She has published more than 130 articles and presented nearly 200 invited talks and keynote lectures.

Glotzer also is a professor of materials science and engineering, macromolecular science and engineering, physics, and applied physics. She is active in science and technology policy and serves on many national advisory and study committees, including the National Academies' Solid State Sciences Committee.

Page, the Leonid Hurwicz Collegiate Professor of Complex Systems, Political Science, and Economics, is the principal investigator for two large projects funded by the National Science Foundation: the IDEAS IGERT grant and Project SLUCE, a bio-complexity grant. He also directs Project Diversity, an interdisciplinary effort to understand the theoretical implications of diversity.

Page, the Leonid Hurwicz Collegiate Professor of Complex Systems, Political Science, and Economics, is the principal investigator for the IDEAS IGERT grant, funded by the National Science Foundation. He studies the importance of diversity and complexity in social systems and is the author of more than 60 articles and four books including the recently released "Diversity and Complexity." He regularly consults with government, business, and educational institutions on the pragmatic benefits of diversity.

Page also is a professor of political science and economics, a research professor at the Center for Political Studies, and director of the Center for the Study of Complex Systems. He belongs to several research teams, including the MacArthur Foundation's working group on economic inequality and social interactions.

The new class of fellows will be inducted at a ceremony Oct. 1 at the academy's headquarters in Cambridge, Mass.