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Exhibits

Andy Goldsworthy: Mountain and Coast, Autumn into Winter, Museum of Art, Feb. 1–April 13.courtesy Haines Gallery, San Francisco

Andy Goldsworthy: Mountain and Coast, Autumn into Winter, Museum of Art, Feb. 1–April 13. Presenting a rich overview of the work of this British “environmental sculptor,” the exhibition explores Goldworthy’s interest in working with and within the natural world. For more than two decades, Goldworthy has been shaping leaves, branches, snow, ice, petals, earth and stone into temporary landscape creations that reflect a deep reverence for a connection to nature. Sponsored by the Museum of Art, 763-8662.
African American Music Collection and NC Standifer Video Archive of Oral History, Black American Musicians, includes rare scores, sheet music, photographs, original 78 rpm recordings (now on CD), movie scripts, rare manuscripts and videotaped interviews with historically important Black musicians. Viewing and listening facilities are available. 101 West Hall, 8:30 a.m.–4 p.m. Mon–Fri, 764-8338.
African Art of Dual Worlds, Curtis Gallery, Museum of Art. Sponsored by the Museum of Art, 763-8662.
Annual Architecture Program Student Exhibition, Art and Architecture Building, Studio Gallery, through Feb. 7. Sponsored by the A. Alfred Taubman College of Architecture and Urban Planning, 764-1300.
The Brotherhood of Free Culture: Recent Art from St. Petersburg, Russia, by Alexei Leporc, Center for Russian and East European Studies, through March 14, 647-4185.
Ceramics, by May Oppenheim, Taubman Lobby, North, Floor 1, through Feb. 13. Sponsored by Gifts of Art, 936-2787.
Ceramics, by John & Suzanne Stephenson, Cancer Center & Geriatrics Center, Main Lobby, Floor B2, through Feb. 13. Sponsored by Gifts of Art, 936-2787.
Children’s Book Illustrations, by Michael Glenn Monroe, University Hospital Main Corridor, Floor 2, through Feb. 13. Sponsored by Gifts of Art, 936-2787.
Contemporary Arabic Calligraphy, by Khaled al-Saa’I, Museum of Art, through Jan. 26. Sponsored by the Museum of Art, 763-8662.
A Dance of Chaos and Order, Biegas Gallery, East Detroit, through Jan. 24. A group exhibition by Art du Jour, a local group of visual artists, including School of Art and Design Asst. Prof. Jaye Schlesinger. Examines each artist’s response to our chaotic world—emotionally, spiritually, intellectually or mechanically. Sponsored by the School of Art and Design, 615-6761.
Decorative Dolls and Sculpture, by Carlye Crisler, Taubman Lobby, South, Floor 1, through Feb. 13. Sponsored by Gifts of Art, 936-2787.
Digital Photography, by Donna Cyrbok, Taubman Lobby, Floor 1, through Feb. 13. Sponsored by Gifts of Art, 936-2787.
Eighteenth-Century French Prints and Drawings, Museum of Art, Feb. 1–May 4. The 18th century was a period of great transition, and throughout the century outstanding draftsmen and printmakers marked the shifts in society, taste and the marketplace. Drawings and prints were avidly collected as freestanding, independent works of art. The 18th century also witnessed an important development in printmaking. Sponsored by the Museum of Art, 763-8662.
Illustrating Shakespeare, Harlan Hatcher Graduate Library, Special Collections Library, 7th Floor, through March 16. The exhibit draws from the library’s rich Shakespeare Collection, providing a historical overview of book illustrations of scenes and characters from Shakespeare’s plays. Included are materials that emphasize the changing interpretations of the plays over the last 300 years, as well as the relationships between illustrations and dramatic text. Items range from the earliest illustrated edition of Shakespeare’s plays (1709), and engravings based on the Boydell Gallery of late 18th century paintings, to 20th century illustrations such as Salvador Dali’s “Macbeth” and Leonard Baskin’s “Titus Andronicus.” 10 a.m.–5 p.m. Mon–Fri, 10 a.m.–noon Sat, 764-9377.
Fibonacci II, by Herbert W. Johe, Art and Architecture Building, College Gallery. Sponsored by the A. Alfred Taubman College of Architecture and Urban Planning, through Jan. 31, 764-1300.
Grade A U.M.A&D Select, Work, 306 South State Street, through Feb. 23. An all-media group show of undergraduate students selected by School of Art and Design faculty. Sponsored by the School of Art and Design, 936-2082.
Graphic Visions: German Expressionist Prints and Drawings, Museum of Art, Jan. 25–April 6. Nearly a century ago, artists working in Germany sought to create an art that would infuse not only their own work but German society with a new sense of spiritualism and energy. The works they created were fresh, expressive visions of a utopian society. The artists employed distortion and exaggeration to create vibrant and sometimes raw imagery found in German Expressionism from 1905–24. Sponsored by the Museum of Art, 763-8662.

Image Matters, Art and Architecture Building, Jan. 21–Feb. 1. Courtesy SOAD

Image Matters, Art and Architecture Building, Jan. 21–Feb. 1. Several students, professors and instructors construct a room-sized geodesic dome that is an interactive camera obscura. Closing reception, 1 p.m. Feb. 1. Sponsored by the School of Art and Design, 936-2082.
Immedia 2003, Media Union Gallery, Jan. 31–Feb. 8. The immedia electronic art exhibition has developed from a community of artists and thinkers interested in the artistic possibilities of new technologies. The immedia community exhibits the best of such art, eschewing reckless application of powerful technology in favor of electronic art which seeks deeper understandings of technology’s relationship with art and life in contemporary society. Opening performance, 7 p.m. Jan. 31. Lecture by Kit Clayton, 7 p.m., and performance by Clayton and Susan Costabile, 9 p.m. Feb. 1. Sponsored by the School of Art and Design, 936-2082.
Japanese Visions of China, Museum of Art, through Jan. 26. Sponsored by the Museum of Art, 763-8662.
Jiingtamok: Exploring the Powwow Highway, Exhibit Museum of Natural History, through June 30. Features photographs, memorabilia, interviews and sound exploring the meanings and traditions of Native American powwows, with a special focus on powwow traditions in Michigan. Numerous Native individuals were interviewed and their direct quotations tell much of the story. Sponsored by the Exhibit Museum of Natural History, 764-0478.
Ka-Boom! Meteor and Asteroid Impacts, Exhibit Museum of Natural History. The display explains the differences between space dust, meteors, meteorites, meteoroids, asteroids and comets and speculates about the roles asteroids may have had in Earth history (including the theory that an asteroid impact contributed to the demise of the dinosaurs. Sponsored by the Exhibit Museum of Natural History, 764-0478.
Machine-Animal Collages, by Nicolas Lampert, Pierpont Commons, through Jan. 31. Sponsored by Pierpont Commons Arts & Programs, 647-6838.
Memorials of Life in Ancient China: Chinese Mortuary Art across Four Millennia, Museum of Art. Since the beginnings of Chinese civilization, one of its identifying characteristics has been a concern with the welfare of the dead. This exhibition traces evolving customs of burial across four millennia and reveals major shifts in political, social and religious history. Sponsored by the Museum of Art, 763-8662.
Michigan Potters’ Association 21st Jurored Exhibition for Artists in Clay, Dennos Museum Center, Traverse City, through March 2. Sponsored by the School of Art and Design, 615-6761.
Mural Photography, by Dale Fisher, University Hospital, Lobby, Floor 1, through Feb. 13. Sponsored by Gifts of Art, 936-2787.
North Campus Redux, Pierpont Commons, through Jan. 31. As the campus nears its bicentennial, Taubman College of Architecture and Urban Planning students, under the supervision of Dean Douglas Kelbaugh, have undertaken an in-depth study of the needs and wants of the growing campus and have created new visions of North Campus. Conceptual plans include, in addition to libraries, housing and academic buildings, more public destinations and amenities, including a pub, theater and retail space. Sponsored by Pierpont Commons Arts & Programs, 647-6838.
O Soul Come Back! Honoring the Ancestors in Ancient China—Chinese Mortuary Art, Museum of Art. Sponsored by the Museum of Art, 763-8662.
Pat Steir: Colors and Other Colors on Top, Museum of Art, through Feb. 2, 764-0395.
Photo Collage, by Barbara Kerekes, Michigan League Buffet, Feb. 1–28. Sponsored by Michigan League Programming Office, 763-4652.
Photography, by Donna Cybrok, Taubman Lobby, South, Floor 1, through Feb. 13. Sponsored by Gifts of Art, 936-2787.
Revelations of the Uprooted, 555 on Third Gallery, 120 East Huron, Feb. 1–14. Recent works by Nisa Joorabchi and SoAD master of fine arts degree candidate Helen C. Lee, exploring origin and the sense of belonging through mixed media. Sponsored by the School of Art and Design, 936-2082.
Sculpture Invitational, Ann Arbor Art Center, 117 West Liberty, through Feb. 2. Sponsored by the School of Art and Design, 615-6761.
Snowflakes, by Thomas Clark, Taubman Lobby, North, Floor 1, through Feb. 13. Sponsored by Gifts of Art, 936-2787.
The Stearns Collection, one of six major collections of musical instruments in North America; contains more than 2,000 instruments, ranging from typical period pieces to rare items, School of Music, 763-4389.
The Sweet Hereafter: Art from the Han Dynasty Tombs, Alfred Berkowitz Gallery, through Feb. 7. A collection of Chinese works on loan from the Detroit Institute of Arts, U-M Museum of Art and several private collectors in Michigan. The exhibition is the project of students enrolled in the museum practice seminar in the U-M–Dearborn Art History program. Sponsored by U-M–Dearborn, (313) 593-5058.
Textiles of Thailand, Harlan Hatcher Graduate Library, Floor 1, North, through Feb. 28. Prepared by the Thai Language Program, the exhibit includes a large and diverse collection of old and new textiles representing various regions and ethnic groups, as well as relevant books available in the campus libraries. Sponsored by Department of Asian Languages & Cultures, 615-5025
Transfiguration, Art and Architecture Building, Jean Paul Slusser Gallery, Jan. 21–Feb. 16. Includes projects engaged in transfiguring places and photographs that capture the inessential background of our richly textured world. Opening reception, 5–7 p.m. Jan. 23. Sponsored by the School of Art and Design, 936-2082.
Treasures of Islamic Art from UMMA Collections, Museum of Art. The Islamic art in the UMMA collection is well-known to scholars throughout the world, but may be much less familiar to regular museum visitors. Sponsored by the Museum of Art, 763-8662.
U-M Detroit Observatory, The oldest observatory in the United States to retain its original telescopes in their mounts. Recently restored, it houses exhibits and collections highlighting the observatory’s role in introducing scientific research to campus, and significant discoveries made by its astronomers. Sponsored by the U-M Detroit Observatory, 763-2230.
Watercolor, by Helen Huebl, Michigan League Buffet, through Jan. 31. Sponsored by Michigan League Programming Office, 763-4652.
Watercolors, by Marcella Pioch, Cancer Center & Geriatrics Center, Turner Clinic Lobby, Floor 1, through Feb. 13. Sponsored by Gifts of Art, 936-2787.
Watercolors of Italy, by Mignonette Yin Cheng, Gallery hours: 9 a.m.–5 p.m. Mon–Fri, closed Tuesday and Thursday noon–2 p.m., Institute for the Humanities, through Jan. 24. Sponsored by the Institute for the Humanities, 936-3518.

Regular Meetings
Alcoholics Anon, Unity AA Group, closed discussion, cross-addicts welcome, 12:10 p.m. Mon–Fri, Guild House Campus Ministry, 802 Monroe, 662-5189.
Guild House, Free casual Sunday supper for students, 6–7:30 p.m., 802 Monroe, 662-5189 or guildhouse@umich.edu.
Health System Pulmonary Rehab, Ann Arbor Better Breathers, 2–4 p.m., 1st Mon, Domino’s Farms EBA Club, 998-8723.
HIV/AIDS Support Group, 5:30–7:30 p.m., alternate Thursday, Taubman Center, 936-8186 or (888) 224-7939.
LGBT Affairs, Creative Expressions Group, 1 p.m. Sat, call for room number, 763-4186.
Turner Geriatric Clinic, Caring for Your Mate, 2–3:30 p.m., 4th Tuesday, Conf Room, Cancer & Geriatrics Center; Caring for Aging Relatives, 2nd Wed, Suite C, Turner Resource Center, Plymouth Rd; African American Senior History Preservation Group, 1:30–3:30 p.m., every other Thursday, Senior Resource Center, 2401 Plymouth Road; 764-2556.
Sailing Club Weekly Meetings, 7:45 p.m., every Thursday, 120 Dennison, 426-4299.

Current
Ongoing>
Upcoming>


Jan. 20–Feb. 3

Monday, January 20
Children’s Program: Annual MLK Day Children’s Program, 8:30 a.m.–2 p.m., Modern Languages Building, Floor 1. In addition to meals and snacks, the event offers storytellers, artists and games and activities highlighting the life and teachings of Martin Luther King Jr. * MLK Symposium 2003 event.
Class: Excel I, 9 a.m.–noon, Room 2074, CSSB. Sponsored by IT Education Services, http://www.itd.umich.edu/education, 763-3700. Registration required.
Class: Dreamweaver I, 1–4 p.m., Room 2074, CSSB. Sponsored by IT Education Services, http://www.itd.umich.edu/education, 763-3700. Registration required.
Colloquium: Marjorie Lee Browne Colloquium, 3:10 p.m., East Hall, Room 1360. William Yslas V Žlez, distinguished professor of mathematics, University of Arizona, will lecture on “The Parakeet Is Gasping.” The main focus of his talk will be to present efforts at increasing the number of minority students pursuing undergraduate degrees in mathematics. * MLK Symposium 2003 event.
Convocation: Business and Finance Martin Luther King Jr. Convocation, 1 p.m., Michigan League, Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre. The convocation features R. Roosevelt Thomas Jr., a well-respected leader in diversity training and consulting and a pioneer in the area of managing diversity in the workplace. He has encouraged many organizations to see that a diverse work environment makes good business sense. * MLK Symposium 2003 event.
Event: The Rhetoric of Resistance/The Rhetoric of Peace, 8 a.m., Michigan Union, Pond Room. * MLK Symposium 2003 event.
Film Screening and Discussion: Film screening and discussion of “Eyes on the Prize” and “At the River I Stand,” 3 p.m., Michigan Union, Pond ABC Rooms. The documentaries chronicle the civil rights marches in Chicago and Cicero, Ill., the 1967 Detroit Riots, and Martin Luther King Jr.’s participation in the strike by Memphis sanitation workers. * MLK Symposium 2003 event.
Forum: College of Engineering MLK Forum: We Must Be the Change We Wish to See in the World (Mahatma Gandhi), 2 p.m., Chrysler Center, Chesebrough Auditorium. Alicia Jones, founder and executive director for the Youth Learning Innovation and Networking for Knowledge and Success (YouthLINKS) program, will speak on the importance of this year’s MLK theme and relate her own experiences. * MLK Symposium 2003 event.
Keynote Lecture: Grace Lee Boggs, 10 a.m., Rackham Auditorium. Boggs is an activist, writer and speaker whose 60 years of political involvement encompasses the major U.S. social movements of this century: labor, civil rights, Black power, Asian American, women’s and environmental justice. She has been an activist in the African American community for more than 60 years. Boggs will share her experiences and anecdotes from her career in progressive activism; her insight into Martin Luther King Jr. and the civil rights movement; and the role of the community, particularly students, in keeping the spirit of King’s efforts alive. * MLK Symposium 2003 event.
Lecture: Be the Change You Wish to See in the World, Dr. Alvin F. Poussiant, noon, Towsley Medical Center, Dow Auditorium. * MLK Symposium 2003 event.
Lecture: Business School Martin Luther King Jr. Lecture, 1:30 p.m., Business School, Hale Auditorium. The Rev. Peter J. Gomes—Plummer Professor of Christian Morals and Pusey Minister in the Memorial Church, Harvard University—will give a lecture, followed by a question-and-answer session. * MLK Symposium 2003 event.
Lecture: Understanding the Need and Accepting the Challenge: Publishing as an Agency of Social Change, 3 p.m., Angell Hall, Auditorium D. Leonard E. Burnett Jr. is group publisher for Vanguarde Media Inc, which publishes HONEY, Savoy and Heart & Soul magazines, each with a focus on urban culture. Previously, Burnett served as associate publisher of Vibe magazine and advertising director of Time magazine. * MLK Symposium 2003 event.
Lecture: Clinging to the Truth in the 21st Century: What the Legacies of King and Gandhi Offer, 4 p.m., School of Education Building, Schorling Auditorium. Lecture by Rajmohan Gandhi, honorary visiting professor and fellow, Centre for Policy Research in New Delhi; visiting professor, Program in South Asian and Middle Eastern Studies, and director, Global Crossroads at University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. He is the grandson of Mahatma Gandhi and the author of Gandhi’s biography “The Good Boatman: A Portrait of Gandhi.” * MLK Symposium 2003 event.
Panel: Title IX, 2 p.m., Kinesiology Building, Bickner Auditorium. A panel of six individuals—including Mike Burns, a university coach, and Jean Hunt, a well-versed lawyer on the issue—will discuss Title IX. * MLK Symposium 2003 event.
Panel: A Dream Deferred: The Intersection of Race, Class & Gender in American Society, 4 p.m., 250 Hutchins Hall, Law Quadrangle. Topics include: “To Fulfill King’s Dream: Critical Race Feminism,” “A Paradigm for Diversity: Beyond Black and White,” and “In the Lead or Left Behind: African-Americans, Civil Rights and the Changing Face of America.” * MLK Symposium 2003 event.
Performance: Sekou Sundiata and Band, 8 p.m., Michigan Theater. Sundiata combines the spoken word with soulful sounds that walk the line between funky jazz and blues. * MLK Symposium 2003 event.
Presentation: James Chaffers, Designing the MLK National Memorial to be Constructed on the Mall in Washington, D.C., 3:30 p.m., Haven Hall, CAAS Conference Room 4710. This graphic and sound presentation embodies the spirit of Martin Luther King Jr. through designs for a memorial to be built in honor of the legacy of his ideals. * MLK Symposium 2003 event.
Planetarium Show: The People and Their Sky, 1:30, 2:30 & 3:30 p.m., Exhibit Museum of Natural History, Planetarium. “The People and Their Sky” looks at the sky tales of several African tribes, and at the tales and superstitions of Africans who were brought to America in the slave trade. * MLK Symposium 2003 event.
U-M–Dearborn MLK Activities: Volunteers from the campus and the surrounding community assist teenage girls with craft projects at Barat Child and Family Services, prepare a meal for residents of the Ronald McDonald House and make presentations about Martin Luther King Jr. to bilingual students at Salina Elementary School in Dearborn, among other activities. The campus is collaborating with United Way Community Services, Davenport University and Henry Ford Community College on the 10th annual Martin Luther King Jr. Community Service Day. Volunteers will meet in the Recreation & Organizations Center (ROC) at 8 a.m. for a kickoff breakfast and the distribution of T-shirts and box lunches. Participants will leave for designated sites at 8:30 a.m. Volunteers are asked to return to the ROC by 3 p.m. for a reception and reflections on the day’s experiences. For more information, or to volunteer, contact Karen Holland at (313) 593-5330.
U-M–Flint MLK Activities: Students, faculty and staff will volunteer at sites around Genessee County. The theme is “Remember! Celebrate! Act!—A Day On, Not a Day Off.” In addition, volunteers will help paint a mural at King Elementary School in Flint. There will be a film presentation of “The Color of Fear” 2–4:30 p.m. in the Kiva in the Harding Mott University Center. The film explores race relations in the United States through the eyes of eight Americans of different ethnic heritages. A panel discussion will follow. For more information, visit http://www.flint.umich.edu/departments/stlife/mlkday/mlk.html.
Walk to Keynote Lecture: Health Sciences Scholars Program Students Walk to Grace Lee Boggs Address, 9:30 a.m., Mary Markley Residence Hall, Sharangpani Lounge. Students in the Health Sciences Scholars Program will meet to walk to Rackham Auditorium and hear the MLK Symposium 2003 Keynote Lecture, featuring Grace Lee Boggs. A discussion will follow. * MLK Symposium 2003 event.
Workshop: Responding to the “Letter from a Birmingham Jail,” 1:30 p.m., East Quad Residence Hall, Room 126. An interactive workshop drawing from King’s experiences in Birmingham Jail, addressing the current crisis of incarceration among people of color, and incorporating collective writing and performance. * MLK Symposium 2003 event.
Workshop: The 2nd Annual Links for Peace Workshop, 2 p.m., Michigan Union, Room 2105B. Participants are asked to contribute drawings, poetry or a few passionate words to the Links of Peace. When completed, the link will be hung in the Union. * MLK Symposium 2003 event.

Tuesday, January 21
Awards Ceremony: Hopwood Underclassmen Awards Ceremony, 3:30 p.m., Rackham Auditorium. Following the announcement of the winners of the fall term writing contest, Rick Moody, author of “The Black Veil: A Memoir with Digressions,” “The Ice Storm,” “Purple America” and Demonology,” will give a reading. Sponsored by the Department of English Language & Literature, 764-6296.
Book Discussion: School of Nursing Office of Multicultural Affairs Book Club Discussion, noon, School of Nursing, Room 1334. Dr. Patricia Coleman-Burns, director of the Office of Multicultural Affairs in the School of Nursing, will host this informal discussion of “To Kill a Mockingbird” by Harper Lee. * MLK Symposium 2003 event.
Class: Conquering Difficult Conversations (3-week course), 24 hours. Sponsored by HR Development, http://www.umich.edu/~hraa, 764-7410. Registration required.
Class: PowerPoint I, 9 a.m.–noon, Room 2074, CSSB. Sponsored by IT Education Services, http://www.itd.umich.edu/education, 763-3700. Registration required.
Class: Photoshop I, 1–4 p.m., Room 2078, CSSB. Sponsored by IT Education Services, http://www.itd.umich.edu/education, 763-3700. Registration required.
Concert: U-M Chamber Music Ensembles, 8 p.m., McIntosh Theatre. Program will include works for piano and strings by Brahms and Dvorak. Sponsored by the School of Music, 764-0594.
Film: Black Orpheus by Marcel Camus, 7:30 p.m. Pierpont Commons, Piano Lounge. Film is in Portugese with English subtitles. Sponsored by Pierpont Commons Arts & Programs, 647-6838.
Kickoff Event: Ann Arbor Reads Program, 7:30–9 p.m., Ann Arbor Hands-On Museum. Event features Philip Reilly, author of “Abraham Lincoln’s DNA and other Adventures in Genetics.” Sponsored by the Life Sciences Values & Society Program, 995-5439. RSVP required.
Lecture: Melanie Boyd, At Last, Broken: Incest, Damage and New Paradigms of Victim Agency, noon, Institute for the Humanities, Common Room. Sponsored by the Institute for the Humanities, 936-3518.
Lecture: Joseph Lam, Song Huizong’s Musical Performance of Emperorship, noon-1:30 p.m., School of Social Work Building, Room1636 (International Institute). Lam’s lecture uses cultural, theoretical and performance perspectives to discuss the Dashengyue as a performance of emperorship. Sponsored by the Center for Chinese Studies, 764-6308.
Lecture: Jana Nidiffer, Pioneering Deans of Women: More than Wise and Pious Matrons, 3 p.m., U-M Detroit Observatory, 1398 E Ann. Nidiffer, assistant professor of education, will discuss her book on deans of women, the first professional women administrators, who helped women students at coeducational institutions cope with their travails. Sponsored by the U-M Detroit Observatory, 763-2230.
Music: Jazz Jam, 8–10 p.m., Leonardo’s. Bring an instrument and join in or come to listen. Open to all skill levels. Emphasis is on standards, bebop and jazz improvisation. Sponsored by Pierpont Commons Arts & Programs, 647-6838.

Wednesday, January 22
Art Video: Islam vs. Islam, 12:10 p.m., Museum of Art. Bill Moyers conducts a post-Sept. 11 discussion, featuring journalists and scholars speaking about the history and motives of the states grouped under the heading “Islamic nations.” Sponsored by the Museum of Art, 764-0395.
Book Discussion: Bridging Troubled Waters: Conflict Resolution from the Heart by Michelle LeBaron, 4–5 p.m., Michigan League, Kalamazoo Room. Led by Zena Zumeta, a local mediator nationally known for her mediation and training work, the discussion will explore the role of creativity and awareness of relationships in conflict resolution. Sponsored by Mediation Services for Faculty and Staff, 936-4214.
Career Fair: Multicultural Career Fair, noon, Michigan Union Ballroom. http://www.cpp.umich.edu. * MLK Symposium 2003 event.
Class: Word I, 9 a.m.–noon, Room 2078, CSSB. Sponsored by IT Education Services, http://www.itd.umich.edu/education, 763-3700. Registration required.
Class: Dreamweaver II, 1–4 p.m., Room 2074, CSSB. Sponsored by IT Education Services, http://www.itd.umich.edu/education, 763-3700. Registration required.
Class: Windows Introduction, 1–4 p.m., Room 2078, CSSB. Sponsored by IT Education Services, http://www.itd.umich.edu/education, 763-3700. Registration required.
Class: Culinary School and Nutrition Education Classes, A Healthy Chinese Feast with guest chef and dietician Christine Liu, 6–8 p.m., East Ann Arbor Health Center Demonstration Kitchen. Sponsored by M-Fit, 975-4387.
Event: Department of Psychiatry MLK Grand Rounds, 10:30 a.m., Maternal & Child Health Center Auditorium, Room F2305. “The (mis)Classification of Mental Disorder in African Americans: Implementing the DSM Criteria in the Hospital and Community,” presented by Harold W. Neighbors, associate professor, Department of Health Behavior and Health Education; associate director, Program for Research of Black Americans Institute for Social Research; associate director for Research Training Center for Research on Ethnicity, Culture and Health, School of Public Health. * MLK Symposium 2003 event.
Film: Barbershop, 8 p.m., Michigan League, The Underground. Calvin owns a barbershop on the south side of Chicago. When the crew learns of a $50,000 reward for information about a recent heist, the shop, a hotbed for gossip, sends everyone into a tailspin. * MLK Symposium 2003 event.
Lecture: Barbara Anderson and John Romani, Comparative Perspectives on Social-Economic Transitions: Estonia, Russia, South Africa and China, noon, School of Social Work Building, Room 1636 (International Institute). Sponsored by the Center for Russian and East European Studies, 647-4185.
Lecture: Lillian Allen, Women Do This Everyday, 4–6 p.m., School of Social Work Building, Room 1636 (International Institute). Sponsored by the Center for Afroamerican Studies, 764-5517.
Panel: Can We Find a Balance?: Challenges in Finding Equilibrium Between Community and Economic Development, 5:30 p.m., Art and Architecture Building, Lecture Hall 2104. This panel will examine the challenges facing urban areas related to promoting communal and economic well-being. * MLK Symposium 2003 event.
Lecture: How Diversity Affects the Classroom Environment and Student Development, noon, Industrial and Operations Engineering Building, Room 1610. Sylvia Hurtado, associate professor and chair, School of Education’s Center for Higher and Post-Secondary Education, will present research on racial/ethnic diversity in higher education and discuss its impact on the educational environment. * MLK Symposium 2003 event.
Lecture: Continuing Homophobia in Native Literature: Lynn Riggs, A Case Study, 6 p.m., Michigan Union, Pendleton Room. Craig

Womack (Oklahoma Creek-Cherokee) is the author of “Red on Red,” a literary history of the Muskogee Creek Nation, and “Drowning in Fire,” a novel. * MLK Symposium 2003 event.
Lecture: Ann Arbor Reads Program, 6:30–8 p.m., Rackham Auditorium. Undergraduate Research Opportunity Program event features Philip Reilly, author of “Abraham Lincoln’s DNA and other Adventures in Genetics.” Sponsored by the Life Sciences Values & Society Program, http://www.aareads.org. Open to U-M students.
Talk and Signing: Ann Arbor Reads Program, 3 p.m., Downtown Borders. Event features Philip Reilly, author of “Abraham Lincoln’s DNA and other Adventures in Genetics.” Sponsored by the Life Sciences Values & Society Program, http://www.aareads.org.
Workshop: Job Seekers Network Part I: Gearing Up to Find a Job that Fits You, Gaining Further Insight into Your Interests and Skills, noon–1:30 p.m., Center for the Education of Women, 330 E Liberty. The first section of this two-part Job Seekers Network is designed for women who are contemplating their future work and wish to establish a direction before beginning an active job search. Sponsored by the Center for the Education of Women, 998-7080.

Thursday, January 23
Book Reading and Artist Demonstration: Michael and Colleen Moore, 12:10 p.m., U-M Hospital Lobby, Floor 1. Concurrent with an exhibit of original illustrations. Sponsored by Gifts of Art, 936-2787.
Class: Oral Communication Skills for English Language Learners, 9 a.m.–noon. Sponsored by HR Development, http://www.umich.edu/~hraa, 764-7410. Registration required.
Class: Access Tables and Relationships, 9 a.m.–noon, Room 2074, CSSB. Sponsored by IT Education Services, http://www.itd.umich.edu/education, 763-3700. Registration required.
Class: Flash Introduction, 1–4 p.m., Room 2074, CSSB. Sponsored by IT Education Services, http://www.itd.umich.edu/education, 763-3700. Registration required.
Comedy: The Images of Identities, 8:30 p.m., Michigan League, The Underground. The Images of Identities is an all African American comedic skit group. * MLK Symposium 2003 event.
Conference: Charlotte Salomon’s Leben? oder Theater? (Life? or Theater?): Trauma, Memory, Images, Music and Text, Alumni Center (see Don’t Miss box on page 15).
Discussion: Living Social Justice: We Are the Change We Wish to See in the World, 11 a.m., School of Education Building, Schorling Auditorium. The School of Social Work continues its discussion of actualizing the agendas of social justice and multicultural diversity throughout the curriculum and organizational structure of the SSW. * MLK Symposium 2003 event.
Fiction Reading: Lorrie Moore, 5 p.m., Davidson Hall, Room D1276. Sponsored by the Department of English and Office of the Provost, 615-3710.
Film: There’s Always Tomorrow, 7 p.m., Modern Languages Building, Lecture Room II. Sponsored by the Program in Film/Video Studies, 764-0147.
Film: Random Harvest, 8:30 p.m., Modern Languages Building, Lecture Room II. Sponsored by the Program in Film/Video Studies, 764-0147.
Health Information Session: Ask the Personal Trainer, 11:30 a.m.–1:30 p.m., Health and Wellness Resource Center, U-M Hospital, Room 2C223. M-Fit will offer 10-minute one-on-one sessions with a personal trainer. Sponsored by M-Fit, http://www.med.umich.edu/mfit/employee/.
Lecture: Dr. Sid Gilman, New Hope for the Treatment and Prevention of Alzheimer’s Disease, 10–11:30 a.m., Kellogg Eye Center, Auditorium. Sponsored by The Geriatrics Center, 998-9353. Registration required.
Lecture: Geoffrey Murphy, Mouse Models of Age-Related Cognitive Decline, noon, Mental Health Research Institute, Room 1057 (Waggoner Conference Room). Sponsored by the Department of Psychiatry, 936-2072 or 647-3188.
Lecture: Daniel O’Neill, Locating Sympathy and Soseki’s Shumi no iden, noon, School of Social Work Building, Room 1636 (International Institute). Sponsored by the Center for Japanese Studies, 764-6307.
Lecture: John Vasquez, Communicating Across Borders: Latinos in the U.S. Health System, noon–1 p.m., U-M Hospital, Room 2G321. Part of the Multicultural Health Series. Sponsored by the UMHS Program for Multicultural Health’s Cultural Competency Program, 615-1404.
Lecture: Theresa Nguyen, 4 p.m., C.C. Little Building, Room 2548. Sponsored by the Program in Medicinal Chemistry, 647-8429.
Lecture: Ray Hanania, 4 p.m., U-M–Dearborn, CASL Building, Room 1030. Hanania has had his columns and writings published in newspapers around the country and has performed at numerous comedy clubs including Zanie’s—Chicago’s premier comedy club. Sponsored by the Center for Arab American Studies, (313) 593-5209.
Luncheon and Discussion: 5th Annual MLK Luncheon & Discussion Series: Attracting and Retaining a Diverse Engineering Faculty, noon, Lurie Engineering Center, Johnson Room. This program will address the issues surrounding this problem and explore ways to interest more women and underrepresented minorities in engineering and, in particular, academia as career choices. * MLK Symposium 2003 event.
Performance: Lillian Allen. Dub poetry, 4–6 p.m., Haven Hall, Room 4701. Sponsored by the Center for Afroamerican Studies, 764-5517.

Pauline Oliveros, 5 p.m., Media Union Video Studio.Courtesy SOAD

Performance: Pauline Oliveros, 5 p.m., Media Union Video Studio. Oliveros is credited as the founder of meditative music through her work with improvisation, meditation, electronic music, myth and ritual. Sponsored by the School of Art and Design, 936-2082.
Table Tennis Tournament: Entries for the Intramural Sports Program’s 2003 Table Tennis Tournament are due by 4:30 p.m. at the Intramural Sports Building, 606 E. Hoover. Entry fee is $5 for singles and $9 for doubles. The tournament is 10 a.m. Jan. 25 at the Sports Coliseum. Sponsored by the Department of Recreational Sports, 763-3562.
Training Session: Discussion leaders for the Ann Arbor Reads Program, 4–6 p.m., Michigan Union, Anderson D and Pond ABC Rooms. Sponsored by the Life Sciences Values & Society Program, http://www.aareads.org. RSVP required.
Workshop: Getting Started with Dreamweaver MX: Creating Your Pages, 1–3 p.m., Harlan Hatcher Graduate Library, Floor 2. Has the time come to go online with your syllabus and other class materials? In this hands-on workshop, participants will begin with a Word document and convert it to a Web page while discussing the pros and cons of this method. Participants also will use Macromedia Dreamweaver MX to work with the page, adding links, tables and documents. Sponsored by Faculty Exploratory, http://www.lib.umich.edu/exploratory. For faculty members only. Registration required to: lib.workshops@umich.edu.

Friday, January 24
Class: Developing Personal Leadership: Managing the Art of Empowerment, 9 a.m.–noon. Sponsored by HR Development, http://www.umich.edu/~hraa, 764-7410. Registration required.
Class: Excel II, 9 a.m.–noon, Room 2078, CSSB. Sponsored by IT Education Services, http://www.itd.umich.edu/education, 763-3700. Registration required.
Class: Dreamweaver III, 1–3 p.m., Room 2074, CSSB. Sponsored by IT Education Services, http://www.itd.umich.edu/education, 763-3700. Registration required.
Class: WWW HTML Authoring Introduction, 1–5 p.m., Room 2078, CSSB. Sponsored by IT Education Services, http://www.itd.umich.edu/education, 763-3700. Registration required.
Conference: Charlotte Salomon’s Leben? oder Theater? (Life? or Theater?): Trauma, Memory, Images, Music and Text, Alumni Center (see Don’t Miss box on page 15).
Entertainment: Open Mic Night, 8–10 p.m., Leonardo’s. The audience picks a winner at the end of the night. The top performer wins a paid gig at Leonardo’s. Sponsored by Pierpont Commons Arts & Programs, 647-6838.
Faculty Recital: Yehonatan Berick, violin, and Phillip Bush, piano, 8 p.m., Britton Recital Hall. Program will include works by Bartok, Bridge and Beethoven. Sponsored by the School of Music, 764-0594.
Film: Seventeen Years, 8 p.m., Angell Hall, Auditorium A. Based on a true story, the film deals with the guilt and redemption of a family faced with a past that almost cannot be redeemed. Winner of Best Actress and Best Director at the 2002 Silver Screen Awards. Sponsored by the Center for Chinese Studies, 764-6308.
Lecture: The LGBT/Queer Muslim Experience, noon, Michigan Union, Room 3909. Faisal Alam will present information and facilitate a discussion about the meaning of the LGBT/Queer and Muslim identity. Alam is a 25-year old queer-identified Muslim of Pakistani decent. * MLK Symposium 2003 event.
Lecture: Nick Rine, Lawyering in a Place with No Law: Cambodian Women’s Rights, 2 p.m., School of Social Work Building, Room 1644. Sponsored by the Center for Southeast Asian Studies, 764-4568.
Lecture: Lessons From a Queer Muslim, 7 p.m., Michigan Union, Anderson C and D Rooms. See description from noon lecture. * MLK Symposium 2003 event.
Music: Digital Music Ensemble, 8 p.m., Media Union. Sponsored by the School of Music, 764-0594.
Seminar: Informational Meeting about CRLT Grants, 1–2 p.m., Michigan League, Kalamazoo Room. Sponsored by the Center for Research on Learning and Teaching, http://www.crlt.umich.edu, 764-0505.
Workshop: “Change!” A Theater and Movement Workshop by Janet Hegman Shier and Gayle E. Martin, 3 p.m., Residential College, East Quad Residence Hall. Three-hour workshop will explore Mahatma Gandhi’s notion that “We must be the change we wish to see in the world.” Theater (Image Theater and Theater of the Oppressed) and movement exercises will guide participants to greater awareness of the need to push beyond personal limitations and current beliefs. * MLK Symposium 2003 event.

Saturday, January 25
Film: Garam Hawa (Hot Winds), 6:30–10 p.m., Natural Science Auditorium. This film depicts the critical choice that the Muslims of Agra (and by extension, of northern India) confronted in 1947: whether to relocate to the “promised land” of the Muslim state of Pakistan or to remain in the professedly secular state of India as a minority community. Sponsored by the Center for South Asian Studies, 764-0352.
Planetarium Show: The Stars of Winter, 11:30 a.m., 1:30 & 3:30 p.m., Exhibit Museum of Natural History. The winter sky contains the brightest star of any season. Among the constellations are Greek and Roman mythologies. The bright stars, constellations and planets are the subjects of this live and on-tape presentation. Sponsored by the Exhibit Museum of Natural History, 764-0478.
Planetarium Show: The Mars Show, 12:30 & 2:30 p.m., Exhibit Museum of Natural History. Narrated by “Star Trek’s” Patrick Stewart, this program presents a history of the planet and reasons for our interest in it. Following the program, a brief live discussion will update viewers on current issues about Mars. Sponsored by the Exhibit Museum of Natural History, 764-0478.
Tour: Free Dinosaur Tour, 2 p.m., Exhibit Museum of Natural History. A free, 30-minute docent-led tour of the dinosaur exhibits. Sign up the day of the tour. Limit is 15 people. Sponsored by the U-M Credit Union, 764-0478.

Sunday, January 26
Dance Show: Through Dance, 12:30 p.m., Michigan League, Floor 2. The Huaren Cultural Association has invited approximately 20 U-M dance groups and organizations to facilitate the workshop and teach people segments of their respective dances. * MLK Symposium 2003 event.
Gallery Talk: David Choberka, 3 p.m., Museum of Art. Choberka, a doctoral candidate in the German Studies Program and research assistant for “Graphic Visions: German Expressionist Prints and Drawings,” will explore both the compelling artistic movement and the nation and period in which it flourished. Sponsored by the Museum of Art, 764-0395.
Planetarium Show: The Stars of Winter, 1:30 & 3:30 p.m., Exhibit Museum of Natural History (see Jan. 25 description).
Planetarium Show: The Mars Show, 2:30 p.m., Exhibit Museum of Natural History (see Jan. 25 description).
Poetry Reading: George Economou, 3 p.m., Shaman Drum Bookshop, 311-315 South State Street. Economou will read from his poetry, translations, memoir and the new work, “Ananios: The Poems & Fragments of Ananios of Kleitor and their Reception from Antiquity to the Present.” Sponsored by the Classical Studies Program, 936-6099.
Lecture: Marty Figley, Art in the Garden, 1 p.m., Matthaei Botanical Gardens, 1800 Dixboro Road. Slide presentation featuring both serious and whimsical objects from gardens in the United States and abroad. Sponsored by the Friends of Matthaei Botanical Gardens, 998-7061. Registration and fee required for lecture.
Tour: Free Dinosaur Tour, 2 p.m., Exhibit Museum of Natural History (see Jan. 25 description).

Monday, January 27
Awards Reception: Minority International Research Training (MIRT) Awards Reception, 4:30 p.m., Room 1000 (10th floor), 300 North Ingalls. This annual event commemorates Martin Luther King Jr.’s contributions to society by celebrating with U-M students who have just received summer training awards through the Minority International Research Training Program. * MLK Symposium 2003 event.
Class: Excel III, 9 a.m.–noon, Room 2078, CSSB. Sponsored by IT Education Services, http://www.itd.umich.edu/education, 763-3700. Registration required.
Class: Dreamweaver IV, 1–3 p.m., Room 2074, CSSB. Sponsored by IT Education Services, http://www.itd.umich.edu/education, 763-3700. Registration required.
Class: Planning for Retirement, Session C, 4–7 p.m. Sponsored by HR Development, http://www.umich.edu/~hraa, 764-7410. Registration required.
Concert: University Philharmonia Orchestra, 8 p.m., Michigan Theatre. Program will include Dvorak’s Symphony No. 9 “New World” and a performance by a School of Music Concerto Competition winner. Sponsored by the School of Music, 764-0594.
Discussion: Research Responsibility Program, Conflict of Interest, 5–7 p.m., Towsley Center Cafeteria, Room G1320. The latest in a series of information and discussion sessions on responsibility in the conduct and administration of research; co-presented by Steven Goldstein, Ruppenthal Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery and Bioengineering and associate dean for research and graduate studies, Medical School; and Elaine Brock, associate director, Division of Research Development and Administration, and director, Medical School Office of Technology Transfer and Corporate Research. Sponsored by the Office of the Vice President for Research, 647-9085.
Lecture: Alanna Cooper, Meandering About the Fluid Field: An Anthropologist in Search of the Bukharan Jews, noon, Frieze Building, Room 3050. Sponsored by the Center for Judaic Studies and Department of Anthropology, 615-1287.
Lecture: Dell Upton, 6 p.m., Art and Architecture Building, Room 2104. Sponsored by the A. Alfred Taubman College of Architecture and Urban Planning, 764-1300.
Lecture: On Being Human, 7 p.m., Michigan Union, Ballroom. Roberto Rodriguez and Patrisia Gonzales have written the syndicated “Column of the Americas,” distributed by Universal Press Syndicate, since 1994. The writers offer a Latino/indigenous perspective on issues of general interest as well as those that specifically affect Latinos and indigenous peoples throughout the hemisphere. * MLK Symposium 2003 event.
Tuesday, January 28
Class: PageMaker Introduction, 9 a.m.–12:30 p.m., Room 2074, CSSB. Sponsored by IT Education Services, http://www.itd.umich.edu/education, 763-3700. Registration required.
Class: Photoshop II, 1–4 p.m., Room 2078, CSSB. Sponsored by IT Education Services, http://www.itd.umich.edu/education, 763-3700. Registration required.
Fair: UnCommon Courses Mini-Courses Fair, 10 a.m.–3 p.m., Pierpont Commons Atrium. On-site registration is available for six-week, non-credit courses at $55 per person, per class. Classes include: tae kwon do, yoga, salsa dancing, bartending and guitar. Sponsored by Pierpont Commons Arts & Programs, 647-6838.
Film: Dodes Ka Den, 7:30 p.m. Pierpont Commons, Piano Lounge. Film is in Japanese with English subtitles. Sponsored by Pierpont Commons Arts & Programs, 647-6838.
Lecture: Lai Guolong, Impersonation and Position in Early Chinese Ritual, noon-1 p.m., School of Social Work Building, Room 1636 (International Institute). Sponsored by the Center for Chinese Studies, 764-6308.
Music: Jazz Jam, 8–10 p.m., Leonardo’s. Bring an instrument and join in or come to listen. Open to all skill levels. Emphasis is on standards, bebop and jazz improvisation. Sponsored by Pierpont Commons Arts & Programs, 647-6838.
Seminar: Interactive Lecturing: Engaging Students in the Learning Process, 4–6 p.m., School of Education Building, Whitney Room. Sponsored by the Center for Research on Learning and Teaching, http://www.crlt.umich.edu, 764-0505.
Swimming and Diving Meet: Entries for the Intramural Sports Program’s 2003 Swimming and Diving Meet are due by 4:30 p.m. at the Intramural Sports Building, 606 E. Hoover. Entry fee is $5 per individual and $25 per team. The meet is 6:45 p.m. Jan. 30 at the Canham Natatorium. Sponsored by the Department of Recreational Sports, 763-3562.

Wednesday, January 29
Art Video: Art of the Book: Persian Miniatures from the Shahnameh, 12:10 p.m., Museum of Art. Sponsored by the Museum of Art, 764-0395.
Awards Presentation: North Campus Spirit Awards, 4:30 p.m., School of Music, Britton Recital Hall. Reception, 4:30 p.m., School of Music; program, 5 p.m., Britton Recital Hall. The theme is “Building Community Together” and will feature a keynote speaker, student presentations and an introduction of Spirit Awardees. Dinner for Spirit Awardees and their guests is at the Pierpont Commons, 7 p.m. * MLK Symposium 2003 event.
Class: PowerPoint II, 9 a.m.–noon, Room 2074, CSSB. Sponsored by IT Education Services, http://www.itd.umich.edu/education, 763-3700. Registration required.
Class: Dreamweaver V, 1–3 p.m., Room 2074, CSSB. Sponsored by IT Education Services, http://www.itd.umich.edu/education, 763-3700. Registration required.
Class: Planning for Retirement, Session D, 1:30–4:30 p.m. Sponsored by HR Development, http://www.umich.edu/~hraa, 764-7410. Registration required.
Class: Culinary School and Nutrition Education Classes, Nutrition Education Seminar: Diets Don’t Work. What Does? with M-Fit registered dietician Catherine Fitzgerald, 6–7:30 p.m., East Ann Arbor Health Center Demonstration Kitchen. Sponsored by M-Fit, 975-4387. $20 fee.
Concert: University Symphony Orhcestra, 8 p.m., Michigan Theatre. Program will include Weber’s Overture to Oberon, Nielsen’s Symphony No. 3 and a performance by a Concerto Competition winner. Sponsored by the School of Music, 764-0594.
Fair: UnCommon Courses Mini-Courses Fair, 10 a.m.–3 p.m., Pierpont Commons Atrium. On-site registration is available for six-week, non-credit courses at $55 per person, per class. Classes include: tae kwon do, yoga, salsa dancing, bartending and guitar. Sponsored by Pierpont Commons Arts & Programs, 647-6838.
Lecture: Federico Varese, Moscow-Rome and Return: A Case-Study of Mafia Transplantation, noon, School of Social Work Building, Room 1636, 647-4185.
Lecture: Abdurrahman Wahid, The War on Terror in Southeast Asia, 4:30 p.m., Business School, Room D1276. Wahid is the former President of the Republic of Indonesia and former leader of the moderate Muslim organization Nahdlatul Ulama—the largest Muslim organization in the world. He is also the leading Indonesian proponent of pluralism and of inter-faith and inter-ethnic tolerance, author of numerous books and recipient of numerous awards for his work on religious tolerance and human rights. Sponsored by the Center for Southeast Asian Studies and the International Institute, 936-6510.
Lecture: “Cowboy Bush and Indians: Frontier Mentality and Mother Earth”—Tom B.K. Goldtooth, 6 p.m., Michigan Union, Kuenzel Room. Tom B.K. Goldtooth is the national director of the Indigenous Environmental Network at Bemidji, Minn., near the headwaters of the Mississippi River. He has been recognized for his achievements throughout the past 30 years from his college student years to his adult years as an activist for social change within the Native American community. * MLK Symposium 2003 event.
Lecture: James Gleason, Mars 101, 7:30 p.m., Exhibit Museum of Natural History. Sponsored by the Exhibit Museum of Natural History, 764-0478.

Panel: Changing Landscape of Black America, 3 p.m., Institute for Social Research, Room 6050. A panel presentation will focus on a number of key areas, including economic and social, political and urban development, and health factors, highlighting the changes that have affected Blacks during the 20th century and continue to impact their lives in the 21st century. * MLK Symposium 2003 event.
Tour: Tour, 2–5 p.m., U-M Detroit Observatory, 1398 E Ann. It is the oldest observatory in the United States to retain its original telescopes in their mounts. Recently restored, it houses exhibits and collections highlighting the observatory’s role in introducing scientific research to campus, and significant discoveries made by its astronomers. Sponsored by the U-M Detroit Observatory, 763-2230.
Workshop: Job Seekers Network Part I: Gearing Up to Find a Job that Fits You, Designing a Job Search for the Work that Fits You Best, noon–1:30 p.m., Center for the Education of Women, 330 E Liberty. The first section of this two-part Job Seekers Network is designed for women who are contemplating their future work and wish to establish a direction before beginning an active job search. Sponsored by the Center for the Education of Women, 998-7080.

Thursday, January 30
Class: Advanced Listening Skills, 8:30 a.m.–noon. Sponsored by HR Development, http://www.umich.edu/~hraa, 764-7410. Registration required.
Class: Access Queries I, 9 a.m.–noon, Room 2074, CSSB. Sponsored by IT Education Services, http://www.itd.umich.edu/education, 763-3700. Registration required.
Class: Effective Web Design, 1–4 p.m., Room 2078, CSSB. Sponsored by IT Education Services, http://www.itd.umich.edu/education, 763-3700. Registration required.
Concert: University Dance Company: Resonant Rhythms, 8 p.m., Power Center. Movement set to contemporary percussion rhythms. Highlighting the concert is “North Star,” choreographed by Lar Lubovitch and set to the Phillip Glass composition of the same name. Sponsored by the School of Music, 764-2538. Tickets required.
Discussion: Diversity—The Military Model, 3:30 p.m., Dental Building, Room G390. Discussion and examination of how the U.S. Armed Forces have evolved to value diversity in a culture where common goals are the way of life. * MLK Symposium 2003 event.
Film: Verboten!, 7 p.m., Modern Languages Building, Lecture Room II. Sponsored by the Program in Film/Video Studies, 764-0147.
Film: The Crimson Kimono, 8:45 p.m., Modern Languages Building, Lecture Room II. Sponsored by the Program in Film/Video Studies, 764-0147.
Lecture: Nicolas Beeson, How Nanotechnology Might Someday Cure Cancer, 10–11:30 a.m., Kellogg Eye Center, Auditorium. Sponsored by The Geriatrics Center, 998-9353. Registration required.
Lecture: Heidi Gottfried, Globalization, Gender, and Work in Contemporary Japan, noon, School of Social Work Building, Room 1636 (International Institute). Sponsored by the Center for Japanese Studies, 764-6307.
Lecture: Yvonne Martin, A Personal Viewpoint on the Computer Prediction of Biological Activity of Compounds, 4 p.m., C.C. Little Building, Room 2548. Sponsored by the Program in Medicinal Chemistry, 647-8429.
Lecture: Abdurrahman Wahid, Islam in Indonesia, 4 p.m., School of Social Work Building, Room 1636 (International Institute). See Jan. 29 lecture for Wahid’s background. Sponsored by the Center for Southeast Asian Studies, 764-4568.
Lecture: Anne Perrigo, 5 p.m., Art and Architecture Building Auditorium. Perrigo’s life-size clay pieces focus on myths and other tales as a way to examine contemporary life. Her presentation also will include a discussion of residency programs and other ways to keep making art after leaving school. Sponsored by the School of Art and Design, 936-2082.
Music: Multicultural Music Night, 8:30 p.m., Michigan League, The Underground. Featuring the sounds of Latin America, India, Ireland, Japan and more. * MLK Symposium 2003 event.
Panel: Women in the Aftermath of War and Conflict: Disruption, Displacement and Refugees, 3 p.m., Lane Hall, Room 2239. Three panelists will discuss the displacement and disruption of the lives of women in several areas of conflict. * MLK Symposium 2003 event.
Poetry Reading: Dionne Brand, 5 p.m., Davidson Hall, Room D1276. Sponsored by the Department of English and Office of the Provost, 615-3710.
Seminar: Now That I Have It, What Grade Do I Give It? Evaluating Student Writing, 3–5 p.m., Michigan League, Michigan Room. Sponsored by the Center for Research on Learning and Teaching, http://www.crlt.umich.edu, 764-0505.
Symposium: 7th Annual Nobel Symposia, 4 p.m., West Hall, Room 340. Speakers will discuss the work, impact and personalities of the 2002 Nobel Laureates in physics, chemistry, medicine, literature, peace and economic science. Sponsored by the Center for the Study of Complex Systems, 763-3301.
Workshop: Shingles: What You Really Need to Know, 1–3 p.m., Turner Senior Resource Center, 2401 Plymouth Road. Speakers will discuss what Shingles is, how it is treated and pain control. Sponsored by the Geriatrics Center, 764-2556.

Friday, January 31
Basketball Contest: Entries for the Intramural Sports Program’s 2003 3-Point Shootout and Free-Throw Contest are due at the Intramural Sports Building (IMSB), 606 E. Hoover. Both events will be contested 11 a.m.–6 p.m. at the IMSB. Entry fee is $5 per person and participants may enter at any time during the event. Sponsored by the Department of Recreational Sports, 763-3562.
Class: Asset Allocation, 8:30–11:30 a.m. Sponsored by HR Development, http://www.umich.edu/~hraa, 764-7410. Registration required
Class: Creating a Procedures Manual, 9 a.m.–noon. Sponsored by HR Development, http://www.umich.edu/~hraa, 764-7410. Registration required.
Class: Dreamweaver Navigation Bars, Table Data and Searches, 1–3 p.m., Room 2074, CSSB. Sponsored by IT Education Services, http://www.itd.umich.edu/education, 763-3700. Registration required.
Class: Project I, 1–5 p.m., Room 2078, CSSB. Sponsored by IT Education Services, http://www.itd.umich.edu/education, 763-3700. Registration required.
Concert: Voices of Brazil, featuring Ivan Lins, Ed Motta, Joao Bosco, Leila Pinheiro and Zeila Duncan, 8 p.m. Michigan Theater. Sponsored by the University Musical Society, 764-2538.
Concert: University Dance Company: Resonant Rhythms, 8 p.m., Power Center (see Jan. 31 description).
Faculty Recital: Sean Duggan, piano, 8 p.m., Britton Recital Hall. Program will feature Beethoven’s Diabelli Variations and J.S. Bach’s Goldberg Variations. Sponsored by the School of Music, 764-0594.

Saturday, February 1
Concert: University Dance Company: Resonant Rhythms, 8 p.m., Power Center (see Jan. 31 description).
Film:Train to Pakistan, 6:30–10 p.m., Natural Science Auditorium. A quiet village on the border of India and Pakistan in 1947 has an integrated population of Hindus, Muslims and Sikhs that has lived peacefully and interdependently for generations. The partition of the subcontinent not only makes this community rethink its identity, but also compels its citizens to reevaluate their civic responsibilities and obligations to each other. Sponsored by the Center for South Asian Studies, 764-0352.
Performance: Egberto Gismonti, guitar and piano, 8 p.m., Michigan Theater, 764-2538.
Planetarium Show: The Stars of Winter, 1:30 & 3:30 p.m., Exhibit Museum of Natural History (see Jan. 25 description).
Planetarium Show: The Mars Show, 12:30 & 2:30 p.m., Exhibit Museum of Natural History (see Jan. 25 description).

Sunday, February 2
Concert: University Dance Company: Resonant Rhythms, 2 p.m., Power Center (see Jan. 31 description).
Concert: Michigan Chamber Players, 4 p.m. Rackham Auditorium. Program will include Mendelssohn’s Duetts, Henze’s On Being Beauteous and Reinecke’s Trio. Sponsored by the School of Music, 764-0594.
Curator’s Talk: Sean Ulmer, 3 p.m., Museum of Art. Ulmer, University curator of modern and contemporary art, will lead a discussion of the work and the creative process of Andy Goldworthy, whose installations and color photographs invite viewers to contemplate their own relationship with the world. Sponsored by the Museum of Art, 763-8662.
Lecture: Robert Wuthnow, Christianity in the Third Millennium: Seven Major Trends, 4–5:30 p.m., First Baptist Church, 502 East Huron Street. Examines changes in church participation, the composition of American Christianity and how Christian faith is being affected by popular culture. Sponsored by the Department of Sociology and Program in American Culture, 663-9376.
Planetarium Show: The Stars of Winter, 1:30 & 3:30 p.m., Exhibit Museum of Natural History (see Jan. 25 description).
Planetarium Show: The Mars Show, 2:30 p.m., Exhibit Museum of Natural History (see Jan. 25 description).

Monday, February 3
Class: GoLive Introduction, 1–4 p.m., Room 2078, CSSB. Sponsored by IT Education Services, http://www.itd.umich.edu/education, 763-3700. Registration required.
Lecture: Charlotte Furth, What Do We Think We are Doing When We Do History of the Body?, noon–1:30 p.m., Lane Hall, Room 2239. The history of the body is an exciting and relatively new area that feminists have done much to put on the map. Furth will explore some methodological and philosophical conundrums that emerge when we try to historicize the human body and explore corporeality through words and texts. Sponsored by the Institute for Research on Women and Gender, 764-9537.
Lecture: Robert Wuthnow, Facing Diversity: American Identity and the New Challenges of Religious and Cultural Pluralism, 3:30–5 p.m., Michigan Union, Kuenzel Room. The lecture will examine how ordinary Americans in the post-Sept. 11 era make sense of people whose religious traditions are radically different from their own. Reception, 3 p.m. Sponsored by the Department of Sociology and Program in American Culture, 663-0677.
Meeting: LSA Faculty Meeting, 4:10 p.m., Angell Hall, Auditorium B. Sponsored by LSA, 764-0322.
Recital: Horn Studio Recital, 8 p.m. Featuring students of Soren Hermansson. Sponsored by the School of Music, 764-0594.

* MLK Symposium 2003 events. For more information and event sponsors, visit http://www.mlksymposium.org.

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Wednesday, February 5
Lecture: Thomas Bloom, Running Government Like a Business: An Accountant’s View, 6–7:30 p.m., U-M–Dearborn, School of Management Auditorium. Bloom is director of the defense finance and accounting service for the Department of Defense. Part of the Executive Speaker Series. Sponsored by U-M–Dearborn, (313) 593-5656. Registration required by Jan. 29.

Thursday, February 6
Symposium: 7th Annual Nobel Symposia, 4 p.m., West Hall, Room 340. Speakers will discuss the work, impact and personalities of the 2002 Nobel Laureates in physics, chemistry, medicine, literature, peace and economic science. Sponsored by the Center for the Study of Complex Systems, 763-3301.

Friday, February 7
Open House: U-M–Flint Communication and Art Department, 5–7 p.m., William S. White Building. Prospective students with career goals in media, public relations, graphic arts, or other similar interests are welcome to attend. Guests will be given a tour of the new, state-of-the-art facilities and have the chance to meet with faculty and alumni. Sponsored by the U-M–Flint Communication and Art Department, (810) 762-3351.

Friday, February 14
Symposium: Alternative Energy: Economic Impact and Opportunity, 8 a.m.–1 p.m., Crowne Plaza, Ann Arbor. The need for sustainable alternative energy sources has never been more obvious than it is today. The symposium will discuss how investment capital can be attracted to the alternative energy sector to spur innovation and commercialization, current market adoption of fuel cell technologies and Michigan’s future in alternative energy. Organizers hope the event will start a conversation concerning the alternative energy market sector and how Michigan, its companies, its research institutions and its investors are situated to play leadership roles in this evolving market. For registration information, visit http://www.zli.bus.umich.edu/news_events/ or call 615-4419. Sponsored by the Zell Lurie Institute for Entrepreneurial Studies, Energy Club, Technology Transfer Office and the Michigan Economic Development Corporation.

Monday, February 17
Lecture: Magnificenza! The Medici, Michelangelo and the Art of Late Renaissance Florence, noon–1 p.m., School of Social Work Building, Room 1636 (International Institute). The second of three lectures and slide shows highlighting the Medici Collection showing at the Detroit Institute of Arts (DIA) March 16–June 8. Sponsored by the Center for European Studies and the DIA, 615-7317.

Friday, February 28
Conference: 21st Annual Career Conference, 8 a.m.–4:30 p.m., Modern Languages Building, and Michigan League. The theme is “One University, One Community, One Destiny: Staff and the University’s Mission.” The conference is open to all and will include workshops on career, financial and personal development. The keynote speaker is Sue Guevara, U-M women’s basketball head coach. Sponsored by the Women of Color Task Force, http://www.umich.edu/~cew/wctfconf.html. Registration and fee required.