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Updated 4:00 PM September 8, 2003
 

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Gerald Ford to attend Ford School site dedication


The Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy will welcome its namesake Sept. 18 for its site dedication.

"Portrait of President Ford," by Ronald Scherr, commissioned by U-M. The work, completed in 2000, will hang in the entry of the new Ford School of Public Policy. It now can be viewed in the Foster Library in Lorch Hall. (Image courtesy Ford School of Public Policy)

Former U.S. President Gerald Ford will attend two events at Rackham Auditorium that highlight the proposed new building for the school near State and Hill streets. Both events are free and open to the public.

Paul O'Neill, former secretary of the treasury, is the keynote speaker for the 10 a.m. program. He will discuss "Values as the Foundation of Public Policy-Making."

A 1:30 p.m. panel will address "The Buck Stops Here: White House Decision Making from Gerald Ford to George W. Bush."

The speakers are:

• David Gergen, director of the Center for Public Leadership at the Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University. He served as White House advisor to Presidents Nixon, Ford, Reagan and Clinton;

• Ann Lewis, national chair of the Women's Vote Center. She was director of communications and counselor to President Clinton from 1997-2000;

• Roger Porter, IBM Professor of Business and Government at the Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University. He served in several capacities in government, beginning his public service career as executive secretary of the President's Economic Policy Board in the Ford Administration.

Founded in 1914 as the Institute of Public Administration, the school was named after President Ford in 1999. Ford, the 38th U.S. president, graduated from U-M in 1935.

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